sodium phosphates injection, USP Clinical Pharmacology

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CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

Phosphorus in the form of organic and inorganic phosphate has a variety of important biochemical functions in the body and is involved in many significant metabolic and enzyme reactions in almost all organs and tissues. It exerts a modifying influence on the steady state of calcium levels, a buffering effect on acid-base equilibrium and a primary role in the renal excretion of hydrogen ion.

Phosphorus is present in plasma and other extracellular fluid, in cell membranes and intracellular fluid, as well as in collagen and bone tissues. Phosphorus in the extracellular fluid is primarily in inorganic form and plasma levels may vary somewhat with age. The ratio of disodium phosphate and monosodium phosphate in the extracellular fluid is 4 to 1 (80% to 20%) at the normal pH of 7.4. This buffer ratio varies with the pH, but owing to its relatively low concentration, it contributes little to the buffering capacity of the extracellular fluid.

Phosphorus, present in large amounts in erythrocytes and other tissue cells, plays a significant intracellular role in the synthesis of high energy organic phosphates. It has been shown to be essential to maintain red cell glucose utilization, lactate production, and the concentration of both erythrocyte adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and 2,3 diphosphoglycerate (DPG), and must be deemed as important to other tissue cells. Hypophosphatemia should be avoided during periods of total parenteral nutrition, or other lengthy periods of intravenous infusions. It has been suggested that patients receiving total parenteral nutrition receive 12 to 15 mM phosphorus per 250 g of dextrose. Serum phosphorus levels should be regularly monitored and appropriate amounts of phosphorus should be added to the infusions to maintain normal serum phosphorus levels. Intravenous infusion of inorganic phosphorus may be accompanied by a decrease in the serum level and urinary excretion of calcium. The normal level of serum phosphorus is 3.0 to 4.5 mg/100 mL in adults; 4.0 to 7.0 mg/100 mL in children.

Intravenously infused phosphorus not taken up by the tissues is excreted almost entirely in the urine. Plasma phosphorus is believed to be filterable by the renal glomeruli, and the major portion of filtered phosphorus (greater than 80%) is actively reabsorbed by the tubules. Many modifying influences tend to alter the amount excreted in the urine.

Sodium is the principal cation of extracellular fluid. It comprises more than 90% of the total cations at its normal plasma concentration of approximately 142 mEq/liter. While the sodium ion can diffuse across cell membranes, intracellular sodium is maintained at a much lower concentration than extracellular sodium through the expenditure of energy by the cell (so called "sodium cation pump"). Loss of intracellular potassium ion is usually accompanied by an increase in intracellular sodium ion.

When serum sodium concentration is low, the secretion of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) by the pituitary is inhibited, thereby preventing water reabsorption by the distal renal tubules. On the other hand, adrenal secretion of aldosterone increases renal tubular reabsorption of sodium in an effort to re-establish normal serum sodium concentration.

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Clinical Pharmacology

CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

Phosphorus in the form of organic and inorganic phosphate has a variety of important biochemical functions in the body and is involved in many significant metabolic and enzyme reactions in almost all organs and tissues. It exerts a modifying influence on the steady state of calcium levels, a buffering effect on acid-base equilibrium and a primary role in the renal excretion of hydrogen ion.

Phosphorus is present in plasma and other extracellular fluid, in cell membranes and intracellular fluid, as well as in collagen and bone tissues. Phosphorus in the extracellular fluid is primarily in inorganic form and plasma levels may vary somewhat with age. The ratio of disodium phosphate and monosodium phosphate in the extracellular fluid is 4 to 1 (80% to 20%) at the normal pH of 7.4. This buffer ratio varies with the pH, but owing to its relatively low concentration, it contributes little to the buffering capacity of the extracellular fluid.

Phosphorus, present in large amounts in erythrocytes and other tissue cells, plays a significant intracellular role in the synthesis of high energy organic phosphates. It has been shown to be essential to maintain red cell glucose utilization, lactate production, and the concentration of both erythrocyte adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and 2,3 diphosphoglycerate (DPG), and must be deemed as important to other tissue cells. Hypophosphatemia should be avoided during periods of total parenteral nutrition, or other lengthy periods of intravenous infusions. It has been suggested that patients receiving total parenteral nutrition receive 12 to 15 mM phosphorus per 250 g of dextrose. Serum phosphorus levels should be regularly monitored and appropriate amounts of phosphorus should be added to the infusions to maintain normal serum phosphorus levels. Intravenous infusion of inorganic phosphorus may be accompanied by a decrease in the serum level and urinary excretion of calcium. The normal level of serum phosphorus is 3.0 to 4.5 mg/100 mL in adults; 4.0 to 7.0 mg/100 mL in children.

Intravenously infused phosphorus not taken up by the tissues is excreted almost entirely in the urine. Plasma phosphorus is believed to be filterable by the renal glomeruli, and the major portion of filtered phosphorus (greater than 80%) is actively reabsorbed by the tubules. Many modifying influences tend to alter the amount excreted in the urine.

Sodium is the principal cation of extracellular fluid. It comprises more than 90% of the total cations at its normal plasma concentration of approximately 142 mEq/liter. While the sodium ion can diffuse across cell membranes, intracellular sodium is maintained at a much lower concentration than extracellular sodium through the expenditure of energy by the cell (so called "sodium cation pump"). Loss of intracellular potassium ion is usually accompanied by an increase in intracellular sodium ion.

When serum sodium concentration is low, the secretion of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) by the pituitary is inhibited, thereby preventing water reabsorption by the distal renal tubules. On the other hand, adrenal secretion of aldosterone increases renal tubular reabsorption of sodium in an effort to re-establish normal serum sodium concentration.

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