NGENLA® Warnings and Precautions

(somatrogon-ghla)

5 WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

5.1 Increased Mortality in Patients with Acute Critical Illness

Increased mortality in patients with acute critical illness due to complications following open heart surgery, abdominal surgery or multiple accidental trauma, or those with acute respiratory failure has been reported with somatropin [see Contraindications (4)]. The safety of continuing NGENLA treatment for the approved indication in patients who concurrently develop these illnesses has not been established.

5.2 Severe Hypersensitivity

Severe systemic hypersensitivity reactions including anaphylaxis and angioedema have been reported with somatropin. Inform patients and/or caregivers that such reactions are possible and that prompt medical attention should be sought if an allergic reaction occurs. NGENLA is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to somatrogon-ghla or any excipients in NGENLA [see Contraindications (4)].

5.3 Increased Risk of Neoplasms

Active Malignancy

There is an increased risk of malignancy progression with somatropin treatment in patients with active malignancy [see Contraindications (4)]. Any preexisting malignancy should be inactive, and its treatment should be completed prior to instituting therapy with NGENLA. Discontinue NGENLA if there is evidence of recurrent malignancy.

Risk of Second Neoplasm in Pediatric Patients

In childhood cancer survivors, who were treated with radiation to the brain/head for their first neoplasm and who developed subsequent GHD and were treated with somatropin, an increased risk of a second neoplasm has been reported. Intracranial tumors, in particular meningiomas, were the most common of these second neoplasms. Monitor all patients with a history of GHD secondary to an intracranial neoplasm while on NGENLA therapy for progression or recurrence of the tumor.

New Malignancy During Treatment

Because children with certain rare genetic causes of short stature have an increased risk of developing malignancies, thoroughly consider the risks and benefits of starting NGENLA in these patients. If treatment with NGENLA is initiated, carefully monitor these patients for development of neoplasms.

Monitor patients on NGENLA therapy carefully for increased growth or potential malignant changes of preexisting nevi. Advise patients and/or caregivers to report marked changes in behavior, onset of headaches, vision disturbances and/or changes in skin pigmentation or changes in the appearance of preexisting nevi.

5.4 Glucose Intolerance and Diabetes Mellitus

Treatment with growth hormone may decrease insulin sensitivity, particularly at higher doses. New onset type 2 diabetes mellitus has been reported in patients receiving growth hormone. Patients with undiagnosed pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus may experience worsened glycemic control and become symptomatic. Monitor glucose levels periodically in all patients receiving NGENLA, especially in those with risk factors for diabetes mellitus, such as obesity, Turner syndrome, or a family history of diabetes mellitus. Patients with preexisting type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus or pre-diabetes should be monitored closely. The doses of antidiabetic agents may require adjustment when NGENLA is initiated.

5.5 Intracranial Hypertension

Intracranial hypertension (IH) with papilledema, visual changes, headache, nausea, and/or vomiting has been reported in patients treated with somatropin. Symptoms usually occurred within the first eight (8) weeks after the initiation of somatropin therapy. In all reported cases, IH-associated signs and symptoms rapidly resolved after cessation of therapy or a reduction of somatropin dose.

Perform fundoscopic examination before initiating treatment with NGENLA to exclude preexisting papilledema and periodically thereafter. If papilledema is identified prior to initiation, evaluate the etiology and treat the underlying cause before initiating NGENLA. NGENLA should be temporarily discontinued in patients with clinical or fundoscopic evidence of IH. If IH is confirmed, restart treatment with NGENLA at a lower dose after IH-associated signs and symptoms have resolved.

5.6 Fluid Retention

Fluid retention during NGENLA therapy may occur. Clinical manifestations of fluid retention (e.g. edema and nerve compression syndromes including carpal tunnel syndrome/paresthesia) are usually transient and dose dependent.

5.7 Hypoadrenalism

Patients receiving growth hormone therapy who have or are at risk for pituitary hormone deficiency(s) may be at risk for reduced serum cortisol levels and/or unmasking of central (secondary) hypoadrenalism. In addition, patients treated with glucocorticoid replacement for previously diagnosed hypoadrenalism may require an increase in their maintenance or stress doses following initiation of NGENLA treatment. Monitor patients for reduced serum cortisol levels and/or need for glucocorticoid dose increases in those with known hypoadrenalism [see Drug Interactions (7)].

5.8 Hypothyroidism

Undiagnosed/untreated hypothyroidism may prevent an optimal response to NGENLA therapy. In patients with GH deficiency, central (secondary) hypothyroidism may first become evident or worsen during treatment with growth hormone therapy. Therefore, patients should have periodic thyroid function tests and thyroid hormone replacement therapy should be initiated or appropriately adjusted when indicated.

5.9 Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

Slipped capital femoral epiphysis may occur more frequently in patients undergoing rapid growth. Evaluate pediatric patients with the onset of a limp or complaints of persistent hip or knee pain.

5.10 Progression of Preexisting Scoliosis

NGENLA increases growth rate, and progression of preexisting scoliosis can occur in patients who experience rapid growth. Growth hormone treatment has not been shown to increase the occurrence of scoliosis. Monitor patients with a history of scoliosis for disease progression.

5.11 Pancreatitis

Cases of pancreatitis have been reported in patients receiving somatropin. The risk may be greater in pediatric patients compared with adults. Consider pancreatitis in patients who develop persistent severe abdominal pain.

5.12 Lipoatrophy

When NGENLA is administered subcutaneously at the same site over a long period of time, lipoatrophy may result. Rotate injection sites when administering NGENLA to reduce this risk [see Dosage and Administration (2.1)].

5.13 Sudden Death in Pediatric Patients with Prader-Willi Syndrome

There have been reports of sudden death after initiating therapy with somatropin in pediatric patients with Prader-Willi syndrome who had one or more of the following risk factors: severe obesity, history of upper airway obstruction or sleep apnea, or unidentified respiratory infection. Male patients with one or more of these factors may be at greater risk than females. NGENLA is not indicated for the treatment of pediatric patients who have growth failure due to genetically confirmed Prader-Willi syndrome.

5.14 Laboratory Tests

Serum levels of phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, and parathyroid hormone may increase with NGENLA therapy. If a patient is found to have abnormal laboratory tests, monitor as appropriate.

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Warnings and Precautions

5 WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

5.1 Increased Mortality in Patients with Acute Critical Illness

Increased mortality in patients with acute critical illness due to complications following open heart surgery, abdominal surgery or multiple accidental trauma, or those with acute respiratory failure has been reported with somatropin [see Contraindications (4)]. The safety of continuing NGENLA treatment for the approved indication in patients who concurrently develop these illnesses has not been established.

5.2 Severe Hypersensitivity

Severe systemic hypersensitivity reactions including anaphylaxis and angioedema have been reported with somatropin. Inform patients and/or caregivers that such reactions are possible and that prompt medical attention should be sought if an allergic reaction occurs. NGENLA is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to somatrogon-ghla or any excipients in NGENLA [see Contraindications (4)].

5.3 Increased Risk of Neoplasms

Active Malignancy

There is an increased risk of malignancy progression with somatropin treatment in patients with active malignancy [see Contraindications (4)]. Any preexisting malignancy should be inactive, and its treatment should be completed prior to instituting therapy with NGENLA. Discontinue NGENLA if there is evidence of recurrent malignancy.

Risk of Second Neoplasm in Pediatric Patients

In childhood cancer survivors, who were treated with radiation to the brain/head for their first neoplasm and who developed subsequent GHD and were treated with somatropin, an increased risk of a second neoplasm has been reported. Intracranial tumors, in particular meningiomas, were the most common of these second neoplasms. Monitor all patients with a history of GHD secondary to an intracranial neoplasm while on NGENLA therapy for progression or recurrence of the tumor.

New Malignancy During Treatment

Because children with certain rare genetic causes of short stature have an increased risk of developing malignancies, thoroughly consider the risks and benefits of starting NGENLA in these patients. If treatment with NGENLA is initiated, carefully monitor these patients for development of neoplasms.

Monitor patients on NGENLA therapy carefully for increased growth or potential malignant changes of preexisting nevi. Advise patients and/or caregivers to report marked changes in behavior, onset of headaches, vision disturbances and/or changes in skin pigmentation or changes in the appearance of preexisting nevi.

5.4 Glucose Intolerance and Diabetes Mellitus

Treatment with growth hormone may decrease insulin sensitivity, particularly at higher doses. New onset type 2 diabetes mellitus has been reported in patients receiving growth hormone. Patients with undiagnosed pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus may experience worsened glycemic control and become symptomatic. Monitor glucose levels periodically in all patients receiving NGENLA, especially in those with risk factors for diabetes mellitus, such as obesity, Turner syndrome, or a family history of diabetes mellitus. Patients with preexisting type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus or pre-diabetes should be monitored closely. The doses of antidiabetic agents may require adjustment when NGENLA is initiated.

5.5 Intracranial Hypertension

Intracranial hypertension (IH) with papilledema, visual changes, headache, nausea, and/or vomiting has been reported in patients treated with somatropin. Symptoms usually occurred within the first eight (8) weeks after the initiation of somatropin therapy. In all reported cases, IH-associated signs and symptoms rapidly resolved after cessation of therapy or a reduction of somatropin dose.

Perform fundoscopic examination before initiating treatment with NGENLA to exclude preexisting papilledema and periodically thereafter. If papilledema is identified prior to initiation, evaluate the etiology and treat the underlying cause before initiating NGENLA. NGENLA should be temporarily discontinued in patients with clinical or fundoscopic evidence of IH. If IH is confirmed, restart treatment with NGENLA at a lower dose after IH-associated signs and symptoms have resolved.

5.6 Fluid Retention

Fluid retention during NGENLA therapy may occur. Clinical manifestations of fluid retention (e.g. edema and nerve compression syndromes including carpal tunnel syndrome/paresthesia) are usually transient and dose dependent.

5.7 Hypoadrenalism

Patients receiving growth hormone therapy who have or are at risk for pituitary hormone deficiency(s) may be at risk for reduced serum cortisol levels and/or unmasking of central (secondary) hypoadrenalism. In addition, patients treated with glucocorticoid replacement for previously diagnosed hypoadrenalism may require an increase in their maintenance or stress doses following initiation of NGENLA treatment. Monitor patients for reduced serum cortisol levels and/or need for glucocorticoid dose increases in those with known hypoadrenalism [see Drug Interactions (7)].

5.8 Hypothyroidism

Undiagnosed/untreated hypothyroidism may prevent an optimal response to NGENLA therapy. In patients with GH deficiency, central (secondary) hypothyroidism may first become evident or worsen during treatment with growth hormone therapy. Therefore, patients should have periodic thyroid function tests and thyroid hormone replacement therapy should be initiated or appropriately adjusted when indicated.

5.9 Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

Slipped capital femoral epiphysis may occur more frequently in patients undergoing rapid growth. Evaluate pediatric patients with the onset of a limp or complaints of persistent hip or knee pain.

5.10 Progression of Preexisting Scoliosis

NGENLA increases growth rate, and progression of preexisting scoliosis can occur in patients who experience rapid growth. Growth hormone treatment has not been shown to increase the occurrence of scoliosis. Monitor patients with a history of scoliosis for disease progression.

5.11 Pancreatitis

Cases of pancreatitis have been reported in patients receiving somatropin. The risk may be greater in pediatric patients compared with adults. Consider pancreatitis in patients who develop persistent severe abdominal pain.

5.12 Lipoatrophy

When NGENLA is administered subcutaneously at the same site over a long period of time, lipoatrophy may result. Rotate injection sites when administering NGENLA to reduce this risk [see Dosage and Administration (2.1)].

5.13 Sudden Death in Pediatric Patients with Prader-Willi Syndrome

There have been reports of sudden death after initiating therapy with somatropin in pediatric patients with Prader-Willi syndrome who had one or more of the following risk factors: severe obesity, history of upper airway obstruction or sleep apnea, or unidentified respiratory infection. Male patients with one or more of these factors may be at greater risk than females. NGENLA is not indicated for the treatment of pediatric patients who have growth failure due to genetically confirmed Prader-Willi syndrome.

5.14 Laboratory Tests

Serum levels of phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, and parathyroid hormone may increase with NGENLA therapy. If a patient is found to have abnormal laboratory tests, monitor as appropriate.

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