NGENLA® Use in Specific Populations

(somatrogon-ghla)

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

8.1 Pregnancy

Risk Summary

There are no available data on NGENLA use in pregnant women to evaluate for a drug associated risk of major birth defects, miscarriage, or other adverse maternal or fetal outcomes. In reproduction studies with pregnant rats, there was no evidence of embryo-fetal toxicity following administration of somatrogon-ghla subcutaneously during organogenesis at doses up to 45 times the maximum recommended human dose based on exposure (see Data).

The background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in the indicated population is unknown. In the U.S. general population, the estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies is 2% to 4% and 15% to 20%, respectively.

Data

Animal Data

In an embryo-fetal development toxicity study in rats, no adverse maternal or embryo-fetal effects were observed when somatrogon-ghla was administered via subcutaneous injection every 2 days from gestation day (GD) 6 to 18 at doses up to 30 mg/kg (45 times the maximum recommended human dose based on Cav exposure).

In a pre- and postnatal development study in rats, somatrogon-ghla was administered via subcutaneous injection to pregnant rats every 2 days from GD 6 to lactation day 20 at doses up to 30 mg/kg. There was no evidence of maternal toxicity and no adverse effects on the first generation (F1) offspring. Somatrogon-ghla elicited an increase in F1 mean body weights in both sexes and increased the mean copulatory interval in F1 females at the highest dose (30 mg/kg), consistent with a longer estrous cycle length. However, there were no effects on mating indices in F1 females.

8.2 Lactation

Risk Summary

There are no data on the presence of somatrogon-ghla in human or animal milk, the effects on the breastfed infant, or the effects on milk production. The developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding should be considered along with the mother’s clinical need for NGENLA and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed infant from NGENLA or from the underlying maternal condition.

8.3 Females and Males of Reproductive Potential

Pregnancy Testing

Although somatrogon-ghla did not interfere with hCG pregnancy testing in a limited number of commercial tests, interference with hCG blood and urine pregnancy testing in patients receiving somatrogon-ghla may be possible, leading to either false positive or false negative results. Alternative methods (i.e., not reliant on hCG) are recommended to determine pregnancy.

8.4 Pediatric Use

The safety and effectiveness of NGENLA have been established for the treatment of growth failure due to inadequate secretion of endogenous growth hormone (GH) in pediatric patients aged 3 years and older [see Clinical Studies (14.1)]. The use of NGENLA for this indication is supported by evidence from a 52‑week, multi-center, randomized, open-label, active-controlled, parallel-group phase 3 study in 224 treatment-naïve, prepubertal pediatric subjects with growth hormone deficiency.

Risks in pediatric patients associated with growth hormone use include:

Increased risk of second neoplasm in pediatric cancer survivors treated with radiation to the brain and/or head [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3)]
Slipped capital femoral epiphysis [see Warnings and Precautions (5.9)]
Progression of preexisting scoliosis [see Warnings and Precautions (5.10)]
Pancreatitis [see Warnings and Precautions (5.11)]
Sudden death in pediatric patients with Prader-Willi Syndrome. NGENLA is not indicated for the treatment of pediatric patients with growth failure secondary to genetically confirmed Prader‑Willi syndrome. [see Warnings and Precautions (5.13)]

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Use in Specific Populations

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

8.1 Pregnancy

Risk Summary

There are no available data on NGENLA use in pregnant women to evaluate for a drug associated risk of major birth defects, miscarriage, or other adverse maternal or fetal outcomes. In reproduction studies with pregnant rats, there was no evidence of embryo-fetal toxicity following administration of somatrogon-ghla subcutaneously during organogenesis at doses up to 45 times the maximum recommended human dose based on exposure (see Data).

The background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in the indicated population is unknown. In the U.S. general population, the estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies is 2% to 4% and 15% to 20%, respectively.

Data

Animal Data

In an embryo-fetal development toxicity study in rats, no adverse maternal or embryo-fetal effects were observed when somatrogon-ghla was administered via subcutaneous injection every 2 days from gestation day (GD) 6 to 18 at doses up to 30 mg/kg (45 times the maximum recommended human dose based on Cav exposure).

In a pre- and postnatal development study in rats, somatrogon-ghla was administered via subcutaneous injection to pregnant rats every 2 days from GD 6 to lactation day 20 at doses up to 30 mg/kg. There was no evidence of maternal toxicity and no adverse effects on the first generation (F1) offspring. Somatrogon-ghla elicited an increase in F1 mean body weights in both sexes and increased the mean copulatory interval in F1 females at the highest dose (30 mg/kg), consistent with a longer estrous cycle length. However, there were no effects on mating indices in F1 females.

8.2 Lactation

Risk Summary

There are no data on the presence of somatrogon-ghla in human or animal milk, the effects on the breastfed infant, or the effects on milk production. The developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding should be considered along with the mother’s clinical need for NGENLA and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed infant from NGENLA or from the underlying maternal condition.

8.3 Females and Males of Reproductive Potential

Pregnancy Testing

Although somatrogon-ghla did not interfere with hCG pregnancy testing in a limited number of commercial tests, interference with hCG blood and urine pregnancy testing in patients receiving somatrogon-ghla may be possible, leading to either false positive or false negative results. Alternative methods (i.e., not reliant on hCG) are recommended to determine pregnancy.

8.4 Pediatric Use

The safety and effectiveness of NGENLA have been established for the treatment of growth failure due to inadequate secretion of endogenous growth hormone (GH) in pediatric patients aged 3 years and older [see Clinical Studies (14.1)]. The use of NGENLA for this indication is supported by evidence from a 52‑week, multi-center, randomized, open-label, active-controlled, parallel-group phase 3 study in 224 treatment-naïve, prepubertal pediatric subjects with growth hormone deficiency.

Risks in pediatric patients associated with growth hormone use include:

Increased risk of second neoplasm in pediatric cancer survivors treated with radiation to the brain and/or head [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3)]
Slipped capital femoral epiphysis [see Warnings and Precautions (5.9)]
Progression of preexisting scoliosis [see Warnings and Precautions (5.10)]
Pancreatitis [see Warnings and Precautions (5.11)]
Sudden death in pediatric patients with Prader-Willi Syndrome. NGENLA is not indicated for the treatment of pediatric patients with growth failure secondary to genetically confirmed Prader‑Willi syndrome. [see Warnings and Precautions (5.13)]
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