NGENLA® Medication Guide

(somatrogon-ghla)

17 PATIENT COUNSELING INFORMATION

Advise the patient and/or caregiver to read the FDA-approved patient labeling (Patient Information and Instructions for Use).

Hypersensitivity Reactions

Advise patients and caregivers that serious systemic hypersensitivity reactions (anaphylaxis and angioedema) are possible and that prompt medical attention should be sought if an allergic reaction occurs [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)].

Neoplasm

Advise childhood cancer survivors and caregivers that individuals treated with radiation to the head are at increased risk of secondary neoplasms and, as a precaution, need to be monitored for recurrence. Advise patients to report marked changes in skin pigmentation or changes in the appearance of preexisting nevi [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3)].

Glucose Intolerance/Diabetes Mellitus

Advise patients and caregivers that new onset of insulin resistance and hyperglycemia may occur and monitoring of blood glucose during treatment with NGENLA in patients with glucose intolerance or who have risk factors for diabetes, may be needed [see Warnings and Precautions (5.4)].

Intracranial Hypertension

Advise patients and caregivers to report to their healthcare provider any visual changes, headache, and nausea and/or vomiting [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5)].

Fluid Retention

Advise patients and caregivers that fluid retention during NGENLA therapy may occur. Inform patients of the clinical manifestations of fluid retention (e.g. edema, arthralgia, myalgia, nerve compression syndromes including carpal tunnel syndrome/paresthesia) and to report to their healthcare provider if any of these signs or symptoms occur during treatment with NGENLA.

Hypoadrenalism

Advise patients and caregivers who have or who are at risk for corticotropin deficiency that hypoadrenalism may develop and to report to their healthcare provider if extreme fatigue, dizziness, weakness, vomiting, dehydration or weight loss is experienced during treatment with NGENLA [see Warnings and Precautions (5.7)].

Hypothyroidism

Advise patients and caregivers that undiagnosed/untreated hypothyroidism may prevent an optimal response to NGENLA. Advise patients and caregivers they may require periodic thyroid function tests during treatment with NGENLA [see Warnings and Precautions (5.8)].

Pancreatitis

Advise patients and caregivers that pancreatitis may develop and to report to their healthcare provider any new onset persistent severe abdominal pain.

Lipoatrophy

Advise patients and caregivers that lipoatrophy may occur if NGENLA is administered subcutaneously at the same site over a long period of time. Advise patients to rotate injection sites when administering NGENLA to reduce this risk.

This Patient Information has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.     Issued: 6/2023

PATIENT INFORMATION
NGENLA (en’ JEN-lah)

(somatrogon-ghla)

injection, for subcutaneous use

What is NGENLA?
NGENLA is a prescription medicine that contains a form of human growth hormone, like the growth hormone made by the human body. NGENLA is given by injection under the skin (subcutaneous) in children who are not growing because of low or no growth hormone levels.

Do not use NGENLA if:

your child has a critical illness caused by certain types of heart or stomach surgery, trauma or breathing (respiratory) problems.
your child is allergic to somatrogon-ghla or any of the ingredients in NGENLA. See the end of this leaflet for a complete list of ingredients in NGENLA.
your child has closed bone growth plates (epiphyses).
your child has cancer or other tumors.
your child’s healthcare provider tells you that your child has certain types of eye problems caused by diabetes (diabetic retinopathy).
your child has Prader-Willi syndrome, is severely obese, or has breathing problems including sleep apnea (briefly stop breathing during sleep).

Before using NGENLA, tell your child’s healthcare provider about all of your child’s medical conditions, including if your child:

has had heart or stomach surgery, trauma or serious breathing (respiratory) problems.
has had a history of problems breathing while they slept (sleep apnea).
has or has had cancer or any tumor.
has diabetes.
is pregnant or plans to become pregnant. It is not known if NGENLA will harm your child’s unborn baby. Talk to your child’s healthcare provider if your child is pregnant or plans to become pregnant.
is breastfeeding or plans to breastfeed. It is not known if NGENLA passes into breast milk. You and your child’s healthcare provider should decide if they will take NGENLA while breastfeeding.

Tell your child’s healthcare provider about all the medicines your child takes, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. NGENLA may affect how other medicines work, and other medicines may affect how NGENLA works.

How should I use NGENLA?

Read the detailed Instructions for Use that come with NGENLA.
NGENLA comes in 2 different dosage strengths. Your child’s healthcare provider will prescribe the dose of medicine and the dosage strength that is right for your child.
Your child’s healthcare provider will show you how to inject NGENLA before it is used for the first time. Do not try to inject NGENLA until you have been shown the right way by your child’s healthcare provider.
Inject NGENLA exactly as your child’s healthcare provider tells you to.
NGENLA is injected under the skin (subcutaneously) and can be given in the stomach (abdomen), thighs, buttocks, or upper arms. Rotate the site of injection weekly.
Inject NGENLA 1 time each week, on the same day each week, at any time of the day.
You may change the day of the week NGENLA is used as long as the last dose was injected 3 or more days before. After the new day of the week has been chosen, continue with the 1 time a week schedule.
If your child misses a dose of NGENLA the missed dose should be injected as soon as possible within 3 days after the missed dose. If more than 3 days have passed, skip your child’s missed dose. Inject the next dose on the regularly scheduled day.
NGENLA prefilled pens are for use by 1 person only.
Do not share your child’s NGENLA prefilled pens and needles with another person, even if the needle has been changed. Your child may give another person an infection or get an infection from them.

What are the possible side effects of NGENLA?

NGENLA may cause serious side effects, including:

high risk of death in people who have critical illnesses because of heart or stomach surgery, trauma or serious breathing (respiratory) problems.
serious allergic reactions. Get medical help right away if your child has the following symptoms:
o
swelling of the face, lips, mouth, or tongue
o
trouble breathing
o
wheezing
o
severe itching
o
skin rashes, redness, or swelling
o
dizziness or fainting
o
fast heartbeat or pounding in the chest
o
sweating
increased risk of growth of cancer or a tumor that is already present and increased risk of the return of cancer or a tumor in people who were treated with radiation to the brain or head as children and who developed low growth hormone problems. Your child’s healthcare provider will need to monitor your child for a return of cancer or a tumor. Contact your child’s healthcare provider if your child starts to have headaches, or has changes in behavior, changes in vision, or changes in moles, birthmarks, or the color of the skin.
new or worsening high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) or diabetes. Your child’s blood sugar may need to be monitored during treatment with NGENLA.
increase in pressure inside the skull (intracranial hypertension). If your child has headaches, eye problems, nausea or vomiting, contact your child’s healthcare provider.
your child’s body holding too much fluid (fluid retention) such as swelling in the hands and feet, pain in the joints or muscles or nerve problems that cause pain, burning or tingling in the hands, arms, legs and feet. Fluid retention can happen in children during treatment with NGENLA. Tell your child’s healthcare provider if your child has any of these signs or symptoms of fluid retention.
decrease in a hormone called cortisol. Your child’s healthcare provider will do blood tests to check your child’s cortisol levels. Tell your child’s healthcare provider if your child has severe fatigue, dizziness, weakness, vomiting, dehydration, or weight loss.
decrease in thyroid hormone levels. Decreased thyroid hormone levels may affect how well NGENLA works. Your child’s healthcare provider will do blood tests to check your child’s hormone levels.
hip and knee pain or limp (slipped capital femoral epiphysis). Tell your child’s healthcare provider if your child has any of these signs or symptoms.
worsening of curvature of the spine (scoliosis). If your child has scoliosis, your child will need to be checked often for an increase in the curve of the spine.
severe and constant stomach (abdominal) pain. This could be a sign of pancreatitis. Tell your child’s healthcare provider if your child has any new abdominal pain.
loss of fat and tissue weakness in the area of skin you inject. Talk to your child’s healthcare provider about rotating the areas where you inject NGENLA.
high risk of sudden death in children with Prader-Willi syndrome who are severely obese or have breathing problems, including sleep apnea.
increase in phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase and parathyroid hormone levels in the blood. Your child’s healthcare provider will do blood tests to check this.

The most common side effects of NGENLA include:

 
o
injection site reactions (such as pain, swelling, rash, itching, bleeding)
o
common cold
o
headache
o
fever
o
low red blood cells (anemia)
o
cough
o
vomiting
o
decrease in thyroid hormone levels
o
stomach (abdominal) pain
o
rash
o
throat pain

These are not all the possible side effects of NGENLA. You should tell your child’s healthcare provider if your child has any side effect that bothers them or that does not go away.

Call your child’s doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

How should I store NGENLA?

Do not freeze your pen or expose it to heat.
Do not use your pen if it has been frozen or stored in direct sunlight.
Do not use after the expiration date printed on the label has passed or if it has been more than 28 days after first use.

Before you use NGENLA pens for the first time (unused pens):

Store in the original carton.
Store the new, unused NGENLA pen in the refrigerator between 36°F to 46°F (2°C to 8°C).
Unused prefilled pens may be used until the expiration date printed on the pen label, if kept in the refrigerator.

After you use NGENLA pens and there is still medicine left (up to 28 days of use):

To help you remember when to dispose of (throw away) the pen, write the date of first use on the pen label.
Store remaining NGENLA in the refrigerator between 36°F to 46°F (2°C to 8°C) and use within 28 days.
Keep the pen cap on the NGENLA pen when it is not in use.
Do not store the remaining NGENLA pen with a needle attached.
Do not use the NGENLA pen if it has been more than 28 days after first use, even if it contains unused medicine.

Keep NGENLA and all medicines out of the reach of children.

General information about the safe and effective use of NGENLA.

Medicines are sometimes prescribed for purposes other than those listed in a Patient Information leaflet. Do not use NGENLA for a condition for which it was not prescribed. Do not give NGENLA to other people, even if they have the same symptoms because it may harm them. You can ask your pharmacist or healthcare provider for information about NGENLA that is written for health professionals.

What are the ingredients in NGENLA?

Active ingredient: somatrogon-ghla


Inactive ingredients:
citric acid monohydrate, histidine, metacresol (as a preservative), poloxamer 188, sodium chloride, sodium citrate, water for injection.

This product's labeling may have been updated. For the most recent prescribing information, please visit www.pfizer.com.


Manufactured by:
Pfizer Ireland Pharmaceuticals
Ringaskiddy,
Cork,
Ireland

US License No: 2060

Logo


LAB-1449-1.0

For more information, go to website www.NGENLA.com or call 1-800-438-1985.

Find NGENLA® medical information:

Find NGENLA® medical information:

Our scientific content is evidence-based, scientifically balanced and non-promotional. It undergoes rigorous internal medical review and is updated regularly to reflect new information.

NGENLA® Quick Finder

Prescribing Information
Download Prescribing Information

Health Professional Information

Medication Guide

17 PATIENT COUNSELING INFORMATION

Advise the patient and/or caregiver to read the FDA-approved patient labeling (Patient Information and Instructions for Use).

Hypersensitivity Reactions

Advise patients and caregivers that serious systemic hypersensitivity reactions (anaphylaxis and angioedema) are possible and that prompt medical attention should be sought if an allergic reaction occurs [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)].

Neoplasm

Advise childhood cancer survivors and caregivers that individuals treated with radiation to the head are at increased risk of secondary neoplasms and, as a precaution, need to be monitored for recurrence. Advise patients to report marked changes in skin pigmentation or changes in the appearance of preexisting nevi [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3)].

Glucose Intolerance/Diabetes Mellitus

Advise patients and caregivers that new onset of insulin resistance and hyperglycemia may occur and monitoring of blood glucose during treatment with NGENLA in patients with glucose intolerance or who have risk factors for diabetes, may be needed [see Warnings and Precautions (5.4)].

Intracranial Hypertension

Advise patients and caregivers to report to their healthcare provider any visual changes, headache, and nausea and/or vomiting [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5)].

Fluid Retention

Advise patients and caregivers that fluid retention during NGENLA therapy may occur. Inform patients of the clinical manifestations of fluid retention (e.g. edema, arthralgia, myalgia, nerve compression syndromes including carpal tunnel syndrome/paresthesia) and to report to their healthcare provider if any of these signs or symptoms occur during treatment with NGENLA.

Hypoadrenalism

Advise patients and caregivers who have or who are at risk for corticotropin deficiency that hypoadrenalism may develop and to report to their healthcare provider if extreme fatigue, dizziness, weakness, vomiting, dehydration or weight loss is experienced during treatment with NGENLA [see Warnings and Precautions (5.7)].

Hypothyroidism

Advise patients and caregivers that undiagnosed/untreated hypothyroidism may prevent an optimal response to NGENLA. Advise patients and caregivers they may require periodic thyroid function tests during treatment with NGENLA [see Warnings and Precautions (5.8)].

Pancreatitis

Advise patients and caregivers that pancreatitis may develop and to report to their healthcare provider any new onset persistent severe abdominal pain.

Lipoatrophy

Advise patients and caregivers that lipoatrophy may occur if NGENLA is administered subcutaneously at the same site over a long period of time. Advise patients to rotate injection sites when administering NGENLA to reduce this risk.

This Patient Information has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.     Issued: 6/2023

PATIENT INFORMATION
NGENLA (en’ JEN-lah)

(somatrogon-ghla)

injection, for subcutaneous use

What is NGENLA?
NGENLA is a prescription medicine that contains a form of human growth hormone, like the growth hormone made by the human body. NGENLA is given by injection under the skin (subcutaneous) in children who are not growing because of low or no growth hormone levels.

Do not use NGENLA if:

your child has a critical illness caused by certain types of heart or stomach surgery, trauma or breathing (respiratory) problems.
your child is allergic to somatrogon-ghla or any of the ingredients in NGENLA. See the end of this leaflet for a complete list of ingredients in NGENLA.
your child has closed bone growth plates (epiphyses).
your child has cancer or other tumors.
your child’s healthcare provider tells you that your child has certain types of eye problems caused by diabetes (diabetic retinopathy).
your child has Prader-Willi syndrome, is severely obese, or has breathing problems including sleep apnea (briefly stop breathing during sleep).

Before using NGENLA, tell your child’s healthcare provider about all of your child’s medical conditions, including if your child:

has had heart or stomach surgery, trauma or serious breathing (respiratory) problems.
has had a history of problems breathing while they slept (sleep apnea).
has or has had cancer or any tumor.
has diabetes.
is pregnant or plans to become pregnant. It is not known if NGENLA will harm your child’s unborn baby. Talk to your child’s healthcare provider if your child is pregnant or plans to become pregnant.
is breastfeeding or plans to breastfeed. It is not known if NGENLA passes into breast milk. You and your child’s healthcare provider should decide if they will take NGENLA while breastfeeding.

Tell your child’s healthcare provider about all the medicines your child takes, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. NGENLA may affect how other medicines work, and other medicines may affect how NGENLA works.

How should I use NGENLA?

Read the detailed Instructions for Use that come with NGENLA.
NGENLA comes in 2 different dosage strengths. Your child’s healthcare provider will prescribe the dose of medicine and the dosage strength that is right for your child.
Your child’s healthcare provider will show you how to inject NGENLA before it is used for the first time. Do not try to inject NGENLA until you have been shown the right way by your child’s healthcare provider.
Inject NGENLA exactly as your child’s healthcare provider tells you to.
NGENLA is injected under the skin (subcutaneously) and can be given in the stomach (abdomen), thighs, buttocks, or upper arms. Rotate the site of injection weekly.
Inject NGENLA 1 time each week, on the same day each week, at any time of the day.
You may change the day of the week NGENLA is used as long as the last dose was injected 3 or more days before. After the new day of the week has been chosen, continue with the 1 time a week schedule.
If your child misses a dose of NGENLA the missed dose should be injected as soon as possible within 3 days after the missed dose. If more than 3 days have passed, skip your child’s missed dose. Inject the next dose on the regularly scheduled day.
NGENLA prefilled pens are for use by 1 person only.
Do not share your child’s NGENLA prefilled pens and needles with another person, even if the needle has been changed. Your child may give another person an infection or get an infection from them.

What are the possible side effects of NGENLA?

NGENLA may cause serious side effects, including:

high risk of death in people who have critical illnesses because of heart or stomach surgery, trauma or serious breathing (respiratory) problems.
serious allergic reactions. Get medical help right away if your child has the following symptoms:
o
swelling of the face, lips, mouth, or tongue
o
trouble breathing
o
wheezing
o
severe itching
o
skin rashes, redness, or swelling
o
dizziness or fainting
o
fast heartbeat or pounding in the chest
o
sweating
increased risk of growth of cancer or a tumor that is already present and increased risk of the return of cancer or a tumor in people who were treated with radiation to the brain or head as children and who developed low growth hormone problems. Your child’s healthcare provider will need to monitor your child for a return of cancer or a tumor. Contact your child’s healthcare provider if your child starts to have headaches, or has changes in behavior, changes in vision, or changes in moles, birthmarks, or the color of the skin.
new or worsening high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) or diabetes. Your child’s blood sugar may need to be monitored during treatment with NGENLA.
increase in pressure inside the skull (intracranial hypertension). If your child has headaches, eye problems, nausea or vomiting, contact your child’s healthcare provider.
your child’s body holding too much fluid (fluid retention) such as swelling in the hands and feet, pain in the joints or muscles or nerve problems that cause pain, burning or tingling in the hands, arms, legs and feet. Fluid retention can happen in children during treatment with NGENLA. Tell your child’s healthcare provider if your child has any of these signs or symptoms of fluid retention.
decrease in a hormone called cortisol. Your child’s healthcare provider will do blood tests to check your child’s cortisol levels. Tell your child’s healthcare provider if your child has severe fatigue, dizziness, weakness, vomiting, dehydration, or weight loss.
decrease in thyroid hormone levels. Decreased thyroid hormone levels may affect how well NGENLA works. Your child’s healthcare provider will do blood tests to check your child’s hormone levels.
hip and knee pain or limp (slipped capital femoral epiphysis). Tell your child’s healthcare provider if your child has any of these signs or symptoms.
worsening of curvature of the spine (scoliosis). If your child has scoliosis, your child will need to be checked often for an increase in the curve of the spine.
severe and constant stomach (abdominal) pain. This could be a sign of pancreatitis. Tell your child’s healthcare provider if your child has any new abdominal pain.
loss of fat and tissue weakness in the area of skin you inject. Talk to your child’s healthcare provider about rotating the areas where you inject NGENLA.
high risk of sudden death in children with Prader-Willi syndrome who are severely obese or have breathing problems, including sleep apnea.
increase in phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase and parathyroid hormone levels in the blood. Your child’s healthcare provider will do blood tests to check this.

The most common side effects of NGENLA include:

 
o
injection site reactions (such as pain, swelling, rash, itching, bleeding)
o
common cold
o
headache
o
fever
o
low red blood cells (anemia)
o
cough
o
vomiting
o
decrease in thyroid hormone levels
o
stomach (abdominal) pain
o
rash
o
throat pain

These are not all the possible side effects of NGENLA. You should tell your child’s healthcare provider if your child has any side effect that bothers them or that does not go away.

Call your child’s doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

How should I store NGENLA?

Do not freeze your pen or expose it to heat.
Do not use your pen if it has been frozen or stored in direct sunlight.
Do not use after the expiration date printed on the label has passed or if it has been more than 28 days after first use.

Before you use NGENLA pens for the first time (unused pens):

Store in the original carton.
Store the new, unused NGENLA pen in the refrigerator between 36°F to 46°F (2°C to 8°C).
Unused prefilled pens may be used until the expiration date printed on the pen label, if kept in the refrigerator.

After you use NGENLA pens and there is still medicine left (up to 28 days of use):

To help you remember when to dispose of (throw away) the pen, write the date of first use on the pen label.
Store remaining NGENLA in the refrigerator between 36°F to 46°F (2°C to 8°C) and use within 28 days.
Keep the pen cap on the NGENLA pen when it is not in use.
Do not store the remaining NGENLA pen with a needle attached.
Do not use the NGENLA pen if it has been more than 28 days after first use, even if it contains unused medicine.

Keep NGENLA and all medicines out of the reach of children.

General information about the safe and effective use of NGENLA.

Medicines are sometimes prescribed for purposes other than those listed in a Patient Information leaflet. Do not use NGENLA for a condition for which it was not prescribed. Do not give NGENLA to other people, even if they have the same symptoms because it may harm them. You can ask your pharmacist or healthcare provider for information about NGENLA that is written for health professionals.

What are the ingredients in NGENLA?

Active ingredient: somatrogon-ghla


Inactive ingredients:
citric acid monohydrate, histidine, metacresol (as a preservative), poloxamer 188, sodium chloride, sodium citrate, water for injection.

This product's labeling may have been updated. For the most recent prescribing information, please visit www.pfizer.com.


Manufactured by:
Pfizer Ireland Pharmaceuticals
Ringaskiddy,
Cork,
Ireland

US License No: 2060

Logo


LAB-1449-1.0

For more information, go to website www.NGENLA.com or call 1-800-438-1985.

Medication Guide

Health Professional Information

{{section_name_patient}}

{{section_body_html_patient}}

Resources

Didn’t find what you were looking for? Contact us.

MI Digital Assistant

Chat online with Pfizer Medical Information regarding your inquiry on a Pfizer medicine.

Call 800-438-1985*

*Speak with a Pfizer Medical Information Professional regarding your medical inquiry. Available 9AM-5Pm ET Monday to Friday; excluding holidays.

Medical Inquiry

Submit a medical question for Pfizer prescription products.

Report Adverse Event

Pfizer Safety

To report an adverse event related to the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine, and you are not part of a clinical trial* for this product, click the link below to submit your information:

Pfizer Safety Reporting Site

*If you are involved in a clinical trial for this product, adverse events should be reported to your coordinating study site.

If you cannot use the above website, or would like to report an adverse event related to a different Pfizer product, please call Pfizer Safety at (800) 438-1985.

FDA Medwatch

You may also contact the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) directly to report adverse events or product quality concerns either online at www.fda.gov/medwatch or call (800) 822-7967.