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potassium phosphate injection, USP Clinical Pharmacology

CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

Phosphorus in the form of organic and inorganic phosphate has a variety of important biochemical functions in the body and is involved in many significant metabolic and enzyme reactions in almost all organs and tissues. It exerts a modifying influence on the steady state of calcium levels, a buffering effect on acid-base equilibrium and a primary role in the renal excretion of hydrogen ion.

Phosphorus is present in plasma and other extracellular fluid, in cell membranes and intracellular fluid, as well as in collagen and bone.

Phosphorus in the extracellular fluid is primarily in inorganic form and plasma levels may vary somewhat with age. The ratio of disodium phosphate and monosodium phosphate in the extracellular fluid is 4 to 1 (80% to 20%) at the normal pH of 7.4. This buffer ratio varies with the pH, but owing to its relatively low concentration, it contributes little to the buffering capacity of the extracellular fluid.

Phosphorus, present in large amounts in erythrocytes and other tissue cells, plays a significant intracellular role in the synthesis of high energy organic phosphates. It has been shown to be essential to maintain red cell glucose utilization, lactate production and the concentration of both erythrocyte adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and 2,3 diphosphoglycerate (DPG) and must be deemed as important to other tissue cells. Hypophosphatemia should be avoided during periods of total parenteral nutrition or other lengthy periods of intravenous infusions. Serum phosphorus levels should be regularly monitored and appropriate amounts of phosphorus should be added to the infusions to maintain normal serum phosphorus levels. Intravenous infusion of inorganic phosphorus may be accompanied by a decrease in the serum level and urinary excretion of calcium. The normal level of serum inorganic phosphorus is 3.0 to 4.5 mg/100 mL in adults; 4.0 to 7.0 mg/100 mL in children.

Potassium is the principal intracellular cation; it helps transport dextrose across the cell membrane and contributes to normal renal function. It has been suggested that 40 mEq potassium be used for every 1000 kcal of dextrose supplied to patients receiving total parenteral nutrition and 12 to 15 mM phosphorus for each 250 g of dextrose.

Intravenously infused phosphorus not taken up by the tissues is excreted almost entirely in the urine. Plasma phosphorus is believed to be filterable by the renal glomeruli and the major portion of filtered phosphorus (greater than 80%) is actively reabsorbed by the tubules. Many modifying influences tend to alter the amount excreted in the urine.

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