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PAXLOVID™ (nirmatrelvir tablets; ritonavir tablets)

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

8.1 Pregnancy

Risk Summary

There are no available human data on the use of nirmatrelvir during pregnancy to evaluate for a drug-associated risk of major birth defects, miscarriage, or adverse maternal or fetal outcomes. Published observational studies on ritonavir use in pregnant women have not identified an increase in the risk of major birth defects. Published studies with ritonavir are insufficient to identify a drug-associated risk of miscarriage (see Data). There are maternal and fetal risks associated with untreated COVID-19 in pregnancy (see Clinical Considerations).

In an embryo-fetal development study with nirmatrelvir, reduced fetal body weights following oral administration of nirmatrelvir to pregnant rabbits were observed at systemic exposures (AUC) approximately 10 times higher than clinical exposure at the authorized human dose of PAXLOVID. No other adverse developmental outcomes were observed in animal reproduction studies with nirmatrelvir at systemic exposures (AUC) greater than or equal to 3 times higher than clinical exposure at the authorized human dose of PAXLOVID (see Data).

In animal reproduction studies with ritonavir, no evidence of adverse developmental outcomes was observed following oral administration of ritonavir to pregnant rats and rabbits at doses (based on body surface area conversions) or systemic exposures (AUC) greater than or equal to 3 times higher than clinical doses or exposure at the authorized human dose of PAXLOVID (see Data).

The estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated population is unknown. All pregnancies have a risk of birth defect, loss, or other adverse outcomes. In the U.S. general population, the estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies is 2% to 4% and 15% to 20%, respectively.

Clinical Considerations

Disease-associated Maternal and/or Embryo-fetal Risk

COVID-19 in pregnancy is associated with adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, including preeclampsia, eclampsia, preterm birth, premature rupture of membranes, venous thromboembolic disease, and fetal death.

Data

Human Data

Ritonavir

Based on prospective reports to the antiretroviral pregnancy registry of live births following exposure to ritonavir-containing regimens (including over 3,400 live births exposed in the first-trimester and over 3,500 live births exposed in the second and third trimesters), there was no difference in the rate of overall birth defects for ritonavir compared with the background birth defect rate of 2.7% in the U.S. reference population of the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program (MACDP). The prevalence of birth defects in live births was 2.3% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.9%–2.9%) following first-trimester exposure to ritonavir-containing regimens and 2.9% (95% CI: 2.4%–3.6%) following second and third trimester exposure to ritonavir-containing regimens. While placental transfer of ritonavir and fetal ritonavir concentrations are generally low, detectable levels have been observed in cord blood samples and neonate hair.

Animal Data

Nirmatrelvir

Embryo-fetal developmental (EFD) toxicity studies were conducted in pregnant rats and rabbits administered oral nirmatrelvir doses of up to 1,000 mg/kg/day during organogenesis [on Gestation Days (GD) 6 through 17 in rats and 6 through 19 in rabbits]. No biologically significant developmental effects were observed in the rat EFD study. At the highest dose of 1,000 mg/kg/day, the systemic nirmatrelvir exposure (AUC24) in rats was approximately 8 times higher than clinical exposures at the authorized human dose of PAXLOVID. In the rabbit EFD study, lower fetal body weights (9% decrease) were observed at 1,000 mg/kg/day in the absence of significant maternal toxicity findings. At 1,000 mg/kg/day, the systemic exposure (AUC24) in rabbits was approximately 10 times higher than clinical exposures at the authorized human dose of PAXLOVID. No other significant developmental toxicities (malformations and embryo-fetal lethality) were observed at up to the highest dose tested, 1,000 mg/kg/day. No developmental effects were observed in rabbits at 300 mg/kg/day resulting in systemic exposure (AUC24) approximately 3 times higher than clinical exposures at the authorized human dose of PAXLOVID. A pre- and postnatal developmental (PPND) study in pregnant rats administered oral nirmatrelvir doses of up to 1,000 mg/kg/day from GD 6 through Lactation Day (LD) 20 is ongoing and only interim data through postnatal day (PND) 56 are currently available. Although no difference in body weight was noted at birth when comparing offspring born to nirmatrelvir treated versus control animals, a decrease (8% in males and females) in the body weight of offspring was observed at PND 17. No significant differences in offspring body weight were observed from PND 28 to PND 56. The maternal systemic exposure (AUC24) at 1,000 mg/kg/day was approximately 8 times higher than clinical exposures at the authorized human dose of PAXLOVID. No body weight changes in the offspring were noted at 300 mg/kg/day, resulting in systemic exposure (AUC24) approximately 5 times higher than clinical exposures at the authorized human dose of PAXLOVID.

Ritonavir

Ritonavir was administered orally to pregnant rats (at 0, 15, 35, and 75 mg/kg/day) and rabbits (at 0, 25, 50, and 110 mg/kg/day) during organogenesis (on GD 6 through 17 and 6 through 19, respectively). No evidence of teratogenicity due to ritonavir was observed in rats and rabbits at systemic exposures (AUC) approximately 4 times higher than exposure at the authorized human dose of PAXLOVID. Increased incidences of early resorptions, ossification delays, and developmental variations, as well as decreased fetal body weights were observed in rats in the presence of maternal toxicity, at systemic exposures approximately 4 times higher than exposure at the authorized human dose of PAXLOVID. A slight increase in the incidence of cryptorchidism was also noted in rats (at a maternally toxic dose) at an exposure approximately 5 times the exposure at the authorized human dose of PAXLOVID. In rabbits, resorptions, decreased litter size, and decreased fetal weights were observed at maternally toxic doses approximately 11 times higher than the authorized human dose of PAXLOVID, based on a body surface area conversion factor. In a pre- and postnatal development study in rats, administration of 0, 15, 35, and 60 mg/kg/day ritonavir from GD 6 through postnatal day 20 resulted in no developmental toxicity, at ritonavir doses 3 times higher than the authorized human dose of PAXLOVID, based on a body surface area conversion factor.

8.2 Lactation

Risk Summary

There are no available data on the presence of nirmatrelvir in human or animal milk, the effects on the breastfed infant, or the effects on milk production. A transient decrease in body weight was observed in the nursing offspring of rats administered nirmatrelvir (see Data). Limited published data reports that ritonavir is present in human milk. There is no information on the effects of ritonavir on the breastfed infant or the effects of the drug on milk production. The developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding should be considered along with the mother's clinical need for PAXLOVID and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed infant from PAXLOVID or from the underlying maternal condition. Breastfeeding individuals with COVID-19 should follow practices according to clinical guidelines to avoid exposing the infant to COVID-19.

Data

In the pre- and postnatal developmental study, body weight decreases (up to 8%) were observed in the offspring of pregnant rats administered nirmatrelvir at maternal systemic exposure (AUC24) approximately 8 times higher than clinical exposures at the authorized human dose of PAXLOVID. No body weight changes in the offspring were noted at maternal systemic exposure (AUC24) approximately 5 times higher than clinical exposures at the authorized human dose of PAXLOVID.

8.3 Females and Males of Reproductive Potential

Contraception

Use of ritonavir may reduce the efficacy of combined hormonal contraceptives. Advise patients using combined hormonal contraceptives to use an effective alternative contraceptive method or an additional barrier method of contraception [see Drug Interactions (7.3)].

8.4 Pediatric Use

PAXLOVID is not authorized for use in pediatric patients younger than 12 years of age or weighing less than 40 kg. The safety and effectiveness of PAXLOVID have not been established in pediatric patients. The authorized adult dosing regimen is expected to result in comparable serum exposures of nirmatrelvir and ritonavir in patients 12 years of age and older and weighing at least 40 kg as observed in adults, and adults with similar body weight were included in the trial EPIC-HR [see Adverse Reactions (6.1), Clinical Pharmacology (12.3), and Clinical Studies (14)].

8.5 Geriatric Use

Clinical studies of PAXLOVID include subjects 65 years of age and older and their data contributes to the overall assessment of safety and efficacy [see Adverse Reactions (6.1) and Clinical Studies (14.1)]. Of the total number of subjects in EPIC-HR randomized to receive PAXLOVID (N=1,120), 13% were 65 years of age and older and 3% were 75 years of age and older.

8.6 Renal Impairment

Systemic exposure of nirmatrelvir increases in renally impaired patients with increase in the severity of renal impairment [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

No dosage adjustment is needed in patients with mild renal impairment. In patients with moderate renal impairment (eGFR ≥30 to <60 mL/min), reduce the dose of PAXLOVID to 150 mg nirmatrelvir and 100 mg ritonavir twice daily for 5 days. Prescriptions should specify the numeric dose of each active ingredient within PAXLOVID. Providers should counsel patients about renal dosing instructions [see Patient Counseling Information (17)].

PAXLOVID is not recommended in patients with severe renal impairment (eGFR <30 mL/min based on CKD-EPI formula) until more data are available; the appropriate dosage for patients with severe renal impairment has not been determined.

8.7 Hepatic Impairment

No dosage adjustment of PAXLOVID is needed for patients with either mild (Child-Pugh Class A) or moderate (Child-Pugh Class B) hepatic impairment. No pharmacokinetic or safety data are available regarding the use of nirmatrelvir or ritonavir in subjects with severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh Class C), therefore, PAXLOVID is not recommended for use in patients with severe hepatic impairment [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

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