Sorry, you need to enable JavaScript to visit this website.

LYRICA®, CV (pregabalin) Clinical Studies

14 CLINICAL STUDIES

14.1 Neuropathic Pain Associated with Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

The efficacy of the maximum recommended dose of LYRICA for the management of neuropathic pain associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy was established in three double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter studies with three times a day dosing, two of which studied the maximum recommended dose. Patients were enrolled with either Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes mellitus and a diagnosis of painful distal symmetrical sensorimotor polyneuropathy for 1 to 5 years. A total of 89% of patients completed Studies DPN 1 and DPN 2. The patients had a minimum mean baseline pain score of greater than or equal to 4 on an 11-point numerical pain rating scale ranging from 0 (no pain) to 10 (worst possible pain). The baseline mean pain scores across the two studies ranged from 6.1 to 6.7. Patients were permitted up to 4 grams of acetaminophen per day as needed for pain, in addition to pregabalin. Patients recorded their pain daily in a diary.

Study DPN 1: This 5-week study compared LYRICA 25, 100, or 200 mg three times a day with placebo. Treatment with LYRICA 100 and 200 mg three times a day statistically significantly improved the endpoint mean pain score and increased the proportion of patients with at least a 50% reduction in pain score from baseline. There was no evidence of a greater effect on pain scores of the 200 mg three times a day dose than the 100 mg three times a day dose, but there was evidence of dose dependent adverse reactions [see Adverse Reactions (6.1)]. For a range of levels of improvement in pain intensity from baseline to study endpoint, Figure 1 shows the fraction of patients achieving that level of improvement. The figure is cumulative, so that patients whose change from baseline is, for example, 50%, are also included at every level of improvement below 50%. Patients who did not complete the study were assigned 0% improvement. Some patients experienced a decrease in pain as early as Week 1, which persisted throughout the study.

Figure 1: Patients Achieving Various Levels of Improvement in Pain Intensity – Study DPN 1

Figure 1

Study DPN 2: This 8-week study compared LYRICA 100 mg three times a day with placebo. Treatment with LYRICA 100 mg three times a day statistically significantly improved the endpoint mean pain score and increased the proportion of patients with at least a 50% reduction in pain score from baseline. For various levels of improvement in pain intensity from baseline to study endpoint, Figure 2 shows the fraction of patients achieving that level of improvement. The figure is cumulative, so that patients whose change from baseline is, for example, 50%, are also included at every level of improvement below 50%. Patients who did not complete the study were assigned 0% improvement. Some patients experienced a decrease in pain as early as Week 1, which persisted throughout the study.

Figure 2: Patients Achieving Various Levels of Improvement in Pain Intensity– Study DPN 2

Figure 2

14.2 Postherpetic Neuralgia

The efficacy of LYRICA for the management of postherpetic neuralgia was established in three double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter studies. These studies enrolled patients with neuralgia persisting for at least 3 months following healing of herpes zoster rash and a minimum baseline score of greater than or equal to 4 on an 11-point numerical pain rating scale ranging from 0 (no pain) to 10 (worst possible pain). Seventy-three percent of patients completed the studies. The baseline mean pain scores across the 3 studies ranged from 6 to 7. Patients were permitted up to 4 grams of acetaminophen per day as needed for pain, in addition to pregabalin. Patients recorded their pain daily in a diary.

Study PHN 1: This 13-week study compared LYRICA 75, 150, and 300 mg twice daily with placebo. Patients with creatinine clearance (CLcr) between 30 to 60 mL/min were randomized to 75 mg, 150 mg, or placebo twice daily. Patients with creatinine clearance greater than 60 mL/min were randomized to 75 mg, 150 mg, 300 mg or placebo twice daily. In patients with creatinine clearance greater than 60 mL/min treatment with all doses of LYRICA statistically significantly improved the endpoint mean pain score and increased the proportion of patients with at least a 50% reduction in pain score from baseline. Despite differences in dosing based on renal function, patients with creatinine clearance between 30 to 60 mL/min tolerated LYRICA less well than patients with creatinine clearance greater than 60 mL/min as evidenced by higher rates of discontinuation due to adverse reactions. For various levels of improvement in pain intensity from baseline to study endpoint, Figure 3 shows the fraction of patients achieving that level of improvement. The figure is cumulative, so that patients whose change from baseline is, for example, 50%, are also included at every level of improvement below 50%. Patients who did not complete the study were assigned 0% improvement. Some patients experienced a decrease in pain as early as Week 1, which persisted throughout the study.

Figure 3: Patients Achieving Various Levels of Improvement in Pain Intensity– Study PHN 1

Figure 3

Study PHN 2: This 8-week study compared LYRICA 100 or 200 mg three times a day with placebo, with doses assigned based on creatinine clearance. Patients with creatinine clearance between 30 to 60 mL/min were treated with 100 mg three times a day, and patients with creatinine clearance greater than 60 mL/min were treated with 200 mg three times daily. Treatment with LYRICA statistically significantly improved the endpoint mean pain score and increased the proportion of patients with at least a 50% reduction in pain score from baseline. For various levels of improvement in pain intensity from baseline to study endpoint, Figure 4 shows the fraction of patients achieving those levels of improvement. The figure is cumulative, so that patients whose change from baseline is, for example, 50%, are also included at every level of improvement below 50%. Patients who did not complete the study were assigned 0% improvement. Some patients experienced a decrease in pain as early as Week 1, which persisted throughout the study.

Figure 4: Patients Achieving Various Levels of Improvement in Pain Intensity – Study PHN 2

Figure 4

Study PHN 3: This 8-week study compared LYRICA 50 or 100 mg three times a day with placebo with doses assigned regardless of creatinine clearance. Treatment with LYRICA 50 and 100 mg three times a day statistically significantly improved the endpoint mean pain score and increased the proportion of patients with at least a 50% reduction in pain score from baseline. Patients with creatinine clearance between 30 to 60 mL/min tolerated LYRICA less well than patients with creatinine clearance greater than 60 mL/min as evidenced by markedly higher rates of discontinuation due to adverse reactions. For various levels of improvement in pain intensity from baseline to study endpoint, Figure 5 shows the fraction of patients achieving that level of improvement. The figure is cumulative, so that patients whose change from baseline is, for example, 50%, are also included at every level of improvement below 50%. Patients who did not complete the study were assigned 0% improvement. Some patients experienced a decrease in pain as early as Week 1, which persisted throughout the study.

Figure 5: Patients Achieving Various Levels of Improvement in Pain Intensity– Study PHN 3

Figure 5

14.3 Adjunctive Therapy for Partial-Onset Seizures in Patients 1 Month of Age and Older

Adjunctive Therapy for Partial-Onset Seizures in Adult Patients

The efficacy of LYRICA as adjunctive therapy for partial-onset seizures in adult patients was established in three 12-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter studies. Patients were enrolled who had partial-onset seizures with or without secondary generalization and were not adequately controlled with 1 to 3 concomitant antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Patients taking gabapentin were required to discontinue gabapentin treatment 1 week prior to entering baseline. During an 8-week baseline period, patients had to experience at least 6 partial-onset seizures with no seizure-free period exceeding 4 weeks. The mean duration of epilepsy was 25 years in these 3 studies and the mean and median baseline seizure frequencies were 22.5 and 10 seizures per month, respectively. Approximately half of the patients were taking 2 concurrent AEDs at baseline. Among the LYRICA-treated patients, 80% completed the double-blind phase of the studies.

Table 11 shows median baseline seizure rates and median percent reduction in seizure frequency by dose.

Table 11. Seizure Response in Controlled, Adjunctive Epilepsy Studies in Adults
Daily Dose of Pregabalin Dosing Regimen N Baseline Seizure Frequency/mo Median % Change from Baseline p-value, vs. placebo
Study E1
Placebo BID 100 9.5 0
50 mg/day BID 88 10.3 -9 0.4230
150 mg/day BID 86 8.8 -35 0.0001
300 mg/day BID 90 9.8 -37 0.0001
600 mg/day BID 89 9.0 -51 0.0001
Study E2
Placebo TID 96 9.3 1
150 mg/day TID 99 11.5 -17 0.0007
600 mg/day TID 92 12.3 -43 0.0001
Study E3
Placebo BID/TID 98 11 -1
600 mg/day BID 103 9.5 -36 0.0001
600 mg/day TID 111 10 -48 0.0001

In the first study (E1), there was evidence of a dose-response relationship for total daily doses of LYRICA between 150 and 600 mg/day; a dose of 50 mg/day was not effective. In the first study (E1), each daily dose was divided into two equal doses (twice a day dosing). In the second study (E2), each daily dose was divided into three equal doses (three times a day dosing). In the third study (E3), the same total daily dose was divided into two equal doses for one group (twice a day dosing) and three equal doses for another group (three times a day dosing). While the three times a day dosing group in Study E3 performed numerically better than the twice a day dosing group, this difference was small and not statistically significant.

A secondary outcome measure included the responder rate (proportion of patients with greater than or equal to 50% reduction from baseline in partial seizure frequency). The following figure displays responder rate by dose for two of the studies.

Figure 6: Responder Rate by Adjunctive Epilepsy Study

Figure 6

Figure 7: Seizure Reduction by Dose (All Partial-Onset Seizures) for Studies E1, E2, and E3

Figure 7

Subset evaluations of the antiseizure efficacy of LYRICA showed no clinically important differences as a function of age, gender, or race.

Adjunctive Therapy for Partial-Onset Seizures in Pediatric Patients 4 to Less Than 17 Years of Age

The efficacy of LYRICA as adjunctive therapy in partial-onset seizures was established in a 12-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter study in pediatric patients 4 years to less than 17 years of age with partial-onset seizures with or without secondary generalization. During an 8-week baseline period, patients had to experience at least 6 partial-onset seizures with no seizure-free period exceeding 4 weeks. The mean duration of epilepsy was 6 years and the mean and median baseline seizure frequencies were 57 and 18 seizures per month, respectively. Approximately 74% of the patients were taking 2 to 3 concurrent AEDs at baseline. Among the LYRICA-treated patients, 87% completed the double-blind phase of the study.

In this study, LYRICA 2.5 mg/kg/day (maximum 150 mg/day) and 10 mg/kg/day (maximum 600 mg/day) were compared to placebo. Administration of each daily dose was divided into two equal doses (twice a day dosing). Because of higher weight-normalized clearance in patients with body weight less than 30 kg [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)], the LYRICA dose was increased by 40% to 3.5 mg/kg/day for patients weighing less than 30 kg randomized to the 2.5 mg/kg/day group or to 14 mg/kg/day for patients randomized to the 10 mg/kg/day group.

Table 12 shows median baseline seizure rates, median percent change from baseline in seizure rates, and percent difference relative to placebo (derived from the primary analysis model) by dose.

Table 12. Seizure Response in Controlled Adjunctive Partial-Onset Seizure Study in Pediatric Patients 4 to Less Than 17 Years of Age
Daily Dose of LYRICA N Median Baseline Seizure Frequency/28 days Median % Change from Baseline % Difference Relative to Placebo p-value, versus placebo
Abbreviations: BID=twice daily; N=number.
*
2.5 mg/kg/day: Maximum dose 150 mg/day. Includes patients less than 30 kg for whom dose was adjusted to 3.5 mg/kg/day.
10 mg/kg/day: Maximum dose 600 mg/day. Includes patients less than 30 kg for whom dose was adjusted to 14 mg/kg/day.
Placebo 93 16.5 -16.9 Not applicable
2.5 mg/kg/day (BID)* 104 23.8 -27.3 -10.5 0.2577
10 mg/kg/day (BID) 97 17.5 -37.1 -21.0 0.0185

There was evidence of a dose-response relationship for total daily doses of LYRICA between 2.5 mg/kg/day and 10 mg/kg/day. A significant improvement in seizure rate was observed for LYRICA 10 mg/kg/day group compared with placebo. While the 2.5 mg/kg/day group performed numerically better than placebo, this difference was not statistically significant.

A key secondary efficacy measure, the responder rate (proportion of patients with greater than or equal to 50% reduction from baseline in partial seizure frequency) showed improvements for LYRICA groups compared with placebo. The following figure displays responder rate by dose:

Figure 8: Responder Rate (Greater than or Equal to 50% Reduction)

Figure 8

Adjunctive Therapy for Partial-Onset Seizures in Pediatric Patients 1 Month to Less Than 4 Years of Age

The efficacy of LYRICA as adjunctive therapy in partial-onset seizures was established in a 14-day, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter study in children 1 month to less than 4 years of age with partial-onset seizures with or without secondary generalization. The youngest patient evaluated was 3 months of age. During a 48- to 72-hour baseline video electroencephalogram (EEG), patients had to experience at least 2 partial-onset seizures. The mean duration of epilepsy at baseline was 1.6 years and the mean and median baseline seizure frequencies were 12.2 and 4.4 seizures per day, respectively. Approximately 33%, 50%, and 17% of patients were taking 1, 2, or 3 concurrent AEDs at baseline, respectively. Among the LYRICA-treated patients, 97% completed the double-blind phase of the study.

In this study, LYRICA 7 mg/kg/day and 14 mg/kg/day were compared to placebo. Administration of each daily dose was divided into three equal doses (three times a day dosing). The primary endpoint was the 24-hour partial-onset seizure rate based on the comparison of the baseline video EEG to a repeat 48–72 hour video EEG performed at the end of 14 days of double-blind treatment.

Table 13 shows median baseline seizure rates, median percent change from baseline in seizure rates, and percent difference relative to placebo (derived from the primary analysis model) by dose.

Table 13. Seizure Response in Controlled Adjunctive Partial-Onset Seizure Study in Pediatric Patients 1 Month to Less Than 4 Years of Age
Daily Dose of LYRICA N Median Baseline Seizure Frequency/24 hours Median % Change from Baseline % Difference Relative to Placebo p-value, versus placebo
Abbreviations: N=number of patients
Placebo 53 2.9 22.2 Not applicable
7 mg/kg/day 59 4.7 16.8 15.1 0.4606
14 mg/kg/day 28 5.4 70.0 -43.9 0.0223

A significant improvement in partial-onset seizure rate was observed for LYRICA 14 mg/kg/day group compared with placebo. Patients treated with LYRICA 7 mg/kg/day did not show improvement relative to placebo.

Responder rates (≥50% or greater reduction in partial-onset seizure frequency) were a secondary efficacy parameter; patients treated with LYRICA 14 mg/kg/day showed numerical improvement compared with placebo, while patients treated with LYRICA 7 mg/kg/day did not show improvement relative to placebo: the responder rates were 53.6%, 30.5%, and 41.5% for LYRICA 14 mg/kg/day, LYRICA 7 mg/kg/day, and placebo, respectively.

14.4 Management of Fibromyalgia

The efficacy of LYRICA for management of fibromyalgia was established in one 14-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter study (F1) and one six-month, randomized withdrawal study (F2). Studies F1 and F2 enrolled patients with a diagnosis of fibromyalgia using the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria (history of widespread pain for 3 months, and pain present at 11 or more of the 18 specific tender point sites). The studies showed a reduction in pain by visual analog scale. In addition, improvement was demonstrated based on a patient global assessment (PGIC), and on the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ).

Study F1: This 14-week study compared LYRICA total daily doses of 300 mg, 450 mg and 600 mg with placebo. Patients were enrolled with a minimum mean baseline pain score of greater than or equal to 4 on an 11-point numeric pain rating scale and a score of greater than or equal to 40 mm on the 100 mm pain visual analog scale (VAS). The baseline mean pain score in this trial was 6.7. Responders to placebo in an initial one-week run-in phase were not randomized into subsequent phases of the study. A total of 64% of patients randomized to LYRICA completed the study. There was no evidence of a greater effect on pain scores of the 600 mg daily dose than the 450 mg daily dose, but there was evidence of dose-dependent adverse reactions [see Adverse Reactions (6.1)]. Some patients experienced a decrease in pain as early as Week 1, which persisted throughout the study. The results are summarized in Figure 9 and Table 14.

For various levels of improvement in pain intensity from baseline to study endpoint, Figure 9 shows the fraction of patients achieving that level of improvement. The figure is cumulative. Patients who did not complete the study were assigned 0% improvement. Some patients experienced a decrease in pain as early as Week 1, which persisted throughout the study.

Figure 9: Patients Achieving Various Levels of Improvement in Pain Intensity – Fibromyalgia Study F1

Figure 9
Table 14. Patient Global Response in Fibromyalgia Study F1
Patient Global Impression of Change
Treatment Group
(mg/day)
% Any Improvement 95% CI
PGB = Pregabalin
Placebo 47.6 (40.0,55.2)
PGB 300 68.1 (60.9, 75.3)
PGB 450 77.8 (71.5, 84.0)
PGB 600 66.1 (59.1, 73.1)

Study F2: This randomized withdrawal study compared LYRICA with placebo. Patients were titrated during a 6-week open-label dose optimization phase to a total daily dose of 300 mg, 450 mg, or 600 mg. Patients were considered to be responders if they had both: 1) at least a 50% reduction in pain (VAS) and, 2) rated their overall improvement on the PGIC as "much improved" or "very much improved." Those who responded to treatment were then randomized in the double-blind treatment phase to either the dose achieved in the open-label phase or to placebo. Patients were treated for up to 6 months following randomization. Efficacy was assessed by time to loss of therapeutic response, defined as 1) less than 30% reduction in pain (VAS) from open-label baseline during two consecutive visits of the double-blind phase, or 2) worsening of FM symptoms necessitating an alternative treatment. Fifty-four percent of patients were able to titrate to an effective and tolerable dose of LYRICA during the 6-week open-label phase. Of the patients entering the randomized treatment phase assigned to remain on LYRICA, 38% of patients completed 26 weeks of treatment versus 19% of placebo-treated patients.

When considering return of pain or withdrawal due to adverse events as loss of response (LTR), treatment with LYRICA resulted in a longer time to loss of therapeutic response than treatment with placebo. Fifty-three percent of the pregabalin-treated subjects compared to 33% of placebo patients remained on study drug and maintained a therapeutic response to Week 26 of the study. Treatment with LYRICA also resulted in a longer time to loss of response based on the FIQ1, and longer time to loss of overall assessment of patient status, as measured by the PGIC2.

Figure 10: Time to Loss of Therapeutic Response, Fibromyalgia Study F2 (Kaplan-Meier Analysis)

Figure 10


1
Time to worsening of the FIQ was defined as the time to a 1-point increase from double-blind baseline in each of the subscales, and a 5-point increase from double-blind baseline evaluation for the FIQ total score.
2
Time to PGIC lack of improvement was defined as time to PGIC assessments indicating less improvement than "much improvement."

14.5 Management of Neuropathic Pain Associated with Spinal Cord Injury

The efficacy of LYRICA for the management of neuropathic pain associated with spinal cord injury was established in two double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter studies. Patients were enrolled with neuropathic pain associated with spinal cord injury that persisted continuously for at least three months or with relapses and remissions for at least six months. A total of 63% of patients completed study 1 and 84% completed study 2. The patients had a minimum mean baseline pain score of greater than or equal to 4 on an 11-point numerical pain rating scale ranging from 0 (no pain) to 10 (worst possible pain). The baseline mean pain scores across the two studies ranged from 6.5 to 6.7.

Patients were allowed to take opioids, non-opioid analgesics, antiepileptic drugs, muscle relaxants, and antidepressant drugs if the dose was stable for 30 days prior to screening. Patients were allowed to take acetaminophen and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs during the studies.

Study SCI 1: This 12-week, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, multicenter, flexible dose (150–600 mg/day) study compared pregabalin with placebo. The 12-week study consisted of a 3-week dose adjustment phase and a 9-week dose maintenance phase. Treatment with LYRICA 150–600 mg/day statistically significantly improved the endpoint weekly mean pain score, and increased the proportion of patients with at least a 30% and 50% reduction in pain score from baseline. The fraction of patients achieving various levels of improvement in pain intensity from baseline to Week 12 is presented in Figure 11. Some patients experienced a decrease in pain as early as week 1, which persisted throughout the study.

Figure 11: Patients Achieving Various Levels of Improvement in Pain Intensity – Study SCI 1

Figure 11

Study SCI 2: This 16-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, multicenter, flexible dose (150–600 mg/day, in increments of 150 mg) study compared the efficacy, safety and tolerability of pregabalin with placebo. The 16-week study consisted of a 4-week dose adjustment phase and a 12-week dose maintenance phase. Treatment with LYRICA statistically significantly improved the endpoint weekly mean pain score, and increased the proportion of patients with at least a 30% and 50% reduction in pain score from baseline. The fraction of patients achieving various levels of improvement in pain intensity from baseline to Week 16 is presented in Figure 12. Some patients experienced a decrease in pain as early as week 1, which persisted throughout the study.

Figure 12: Patients Achieving Various Levels of Improvement in Pain Intensity – Study SCI 2

Figure 12

What's New

No Current Announcements.

Therapeutic Area

Contact Pfizer Medical

Search

Please enter your search term(s) for LYRICA®, CV

Contact Pfizer

Need to report an Adverse Event, Side Effect or Product Quality Concern?

Contact Pfizer Safety to report an adverse event, side effect or concern about the quality of a Pfizer product: (800) 438-1985

You may also contact the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) directly to report adverse events or product quality concerns at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/MedWatch

Have a Medical Question on a Pfizer Prescription Medicine?
Contact Pfizer Medical Information to speak with a professional regarding your medical question on a Pfizer prescription product: (800) 438-1985
Have a Question on a Pfizer Over-the-Counter Product?
For Pfizer Consumer Healthcare non-prescription or over-the-counter products such as Advil, Centrum, Nexium or Thermacare, call (800) 322-3129
Have a Question about Pfizer Clinical Trials?
If you are looking for information about Pfizer studies currently recruiting new patients in your area, you can begin your search on our website. For questions about a Pfizer Clinical Trial, call (800) 718-1021 or email [email protected]
Need Information on Pfizer’s Patient Assistance Programs?

Pfizer RxPathways® connects eligible patients, regardless of their insurance status, to a range of assistance programs that offer insurance support, co-pay help, and medicines for free or at a savings. For more information, please call (844) 989-7284 or visit www.PfizerRxPathways.com.

Eligible patients can register for valuable savings offers for nearly 40 brand name medications. Visit www.MyPfizerBrands.com for more information.