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IBRANCE® (palbociclib) Clinical Pharmacology

12 CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

12.1 Mechanism of Action

Palbociclib is an inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) 4 and 6. Cyclin D1 and CDK4/6 are downstream of signaling pathways which lead to cellular proliferation. In vitro, palbociclib reduced cellular proliferation of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer cell lines by blocking progression of the cell from G1 into S phase of the cell cycle. Treatment of breast cancer cell lines with the combination of palbociclib and antiestrogens leads to decreased retinoblastoma (Rb) protein phosphorylation resulting in reduced E2F expression and signaling, and increased growth arrest compared to treatment with each drug alone. In vitro treatment of ER-positive breast cancer cell lines with the combination of palbociclib and antiestrogens led to increased cell senescence compared to each drug alone, which was sustained for up to 6 days following palbociclib removal and was greater if antiestrogen treatment was continued. In vivo studies using a patient-derived ER-positive breast cancer xenograft model demonstrated that the combination of palbociclib and letrozole increased the inhibition of Rb phosphorylation, downstream signaling, and tumor growth compared to each drug alone.

Human bone marrow mononuclear cells treated with palbociclib in the presence or absence of an anti-estrogen in vitro did not become senescent and resumed proliferation following palbociclib withdrawal.

12.2 Pharmacodynamics

Cardiac Electrophysiology

The effect of palbociclib on the QT interval corrected for heart rate (QTc) was evaluated using time-matched electrocardiograms (ECGs) evaluating the change from baseline and corresponding pharmacokinetic data in 77 patients with breast cancer. Palbociclib had no large effect on QTc (i.e., >20 ms) at 125 mg once daily for 21 consecutive days followed by 7 days off treatment to comprise a complete cycle of 28 days.

12.3 Pharmacokinetics

The pharmacokinetics (PK) of palbociclib were characterized in patients with solid tumors including advanced breast cancer and in healthy subjects.

Absorption

The mean maximum observed concentration (Cmax) of palbociclib is generally observed between 6 to 12 hours (time to reach maximum concentration, Tmax) following oral administration. The mean absolute bioavailability of IBRANCE after an oral 125 mg dose is 46%. In the dosing range of 25 mg to 225 mg, the AUC and Cmax increased proportionally with dose in general. Steady state was achieved within 8 days following repeated once daily dosing. With repeated once daily administration, palbociclib accumulated with a median accumulation ratio of 2.4 (range 1.5 to 4.2).

Food effect: Palbociclib absorption and exposure were very low in approximately 13% of the population under the fasted condition. Food intake increased the palbociclib exposure in this small subset of the population, but did not alter palbociclib exposure in the rest of the population to a clinically relevant extent. Therefore, food intake reduced the intersubject variability of palbociclib exposure, which supports administration of IBRANCE with food. Compared to IBRANCE given under overnight fasted conditions, the population average area under the concentration-time curve from zero to infinity (AUCINF) and Cmax of palbociclib increased by 21% and 38%, respectively, when given with high-fat, high-calorie food (approximately 800 to 1000 calories with 150, 250, and 500 to 600 calories from protein, carbohydrate, and fat, respectively), by 12% and 27%, respectively, when given with low-fat, low-calorie food (approximately 400 to 500 calories with 120, 250, and 28 to 35 calories from protein, carbohydrate, and fat, respectively), and by 13% and 24%, respectively, when moderate-fat, standard calorie food (approximately 500 to 700 calories with 75 to 105, 250 to 350 and 175 to 245 calories from protein, carbohydrate, and fat, respectively) was given 1 hour before and 2 hours after IBRANCE dosing.

Distribution

Binding of palbociclib to human plasma proteins in vitro was approximately 85%, with no concentration dependence over the concentration range of 500 ng/mL to 5000 ng/mL. The mean fraction unbound (fu) of palbociclib in human plasma in vivo increased incrementally with worsening hepatic function. There was no obvious trend in the mean palbociclib fu in human plasma in vivo with worsening renal function. The geometric mean apparent volume of distribution (Vz/F) was 2583 L with a coefficient of variation (CV) of 26%.

Metabolism

In vitro and in vivo studies indicated that palbociclib undergoes hepatic metabolism in humans. Following oral administration of a single 125 mg dose of [14C]palbociclib to humans, the primary metabolic pathways for palbociclib involved oxidation and sulfonation, with acylation and glucuronidation contributing as minor pathways. Palbociclib was the major circulating drug-derived entity in plasma (23%). The major circulating metabolite was a glucuronide conjugate of palbociclib, although it only represented 1.5% of the administered dose in the excreta. Palbociclib was extensively metabolized with unchanged drug accounting for 2.3% and 6.9% of radioactivity in feces and urine, respectively. In feces, the sulfamic acid conjugate of palbociclib was the major drug-related component, accounting for 26% of the administered dose. In vitro studies with human hepatocytes, liver cytosolic and S9 fractions, and recombinant SULT enzymes indicated that CYP3A and SULT2A1 are mainly involved in the metabolism of palbociclib.

Elimination

The geometric mean apparent oral clearance (CL/F) of palbociclib was 63.1 L/hr (29% CV), and the mean (± standard deviation) plasma elimination half-life was 29 (±5) hours in patients with advanced breast cancer. In 6 healthy male subjects given a single oral dose of [14C]palbociclib, a median of 91.6% of the total administered radioactive dose was recovered in 15 days; feces (74.1% of dose) was the major route of excretion, with 17.5% of the dose recovered in urine. The majority of the material was excreted as metabolites.

Age, Gender, and Body Weight

Based on a population pharmacokinetic analysis in 183 patients with cancer (50 male and 133 female patients, age range from 22 to 89 years, and body weight range from 37.9 to 123 kg), gender had no effect on the exposure of palbociclib, and age and body weight had no clinically important effect on the exposure of palbociclib.

Pediatric Population

Pharmacokinetics of IBRANCE have not been evaluated in patients <18 years of age.

Hepatic Impairment

Data from a pharmacokinetic trial in subjects with varying degrees of hepatic impairment indicate that palbociclib unbound AUCINF decreased 17% in subjects with mild hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh class A), and increased by 34% and 77% in subjects with moderate (Child-Pugh class B) and severe (Child-Pugh class C) hepatic impairment, respectively, relative to subjects with normal hepatic function. Palbociclib unbound Cmax increased by 7%, 38% and 72% for mild, moderate and severe hepatic impairment, respectively, relative to subjects with normal hepatic function. In addition, based on a population pharmacokinetic analysis that included 183 patients, where 40 patients had mild hepatic impairment based on National Cancer Institute (NCI) classification (total bilirubin ≤ ULN and AST > ULN, or total bilirubin >1.0 to 1.5 × ULN and any AST), mild hepatic impairment had no effect on the exposure of palbociclib, further supporting the findings from the dedicated hepatic impairment study.

Renal Impairment

Data from a pharmacokinetic trial in subjects with varying degrees of renal impairment indicate that palbociclib AUCINF increased by 39%, 42%, and 31% with mild (60 mL/min ≤ CrCl < 90 mL/min), moderate (30 mL/min ≤ CrCl <60 mL/min), and severe (CrCl <30 mL/min) renal impairment, respectively, relative to subjects with normal renal function. Peak palbociclib exposure (Cmax) increased by 17%, 12%, and 15% for mild, moderate, and severe renal impairment, respectively, relative to subjects with normal renal function. In addition, based on a population pharmacokinetic analysis that included 183 patients where 73 patients had mild renal impairment and 29 patients had moderate renal impairment, mild and moderate renal impairment had no effect on the exposure of palbociclib. The pharmacokinetics of palbociclib have not been studied in patients requiring hemodialysis.

Drug Interactions

In vitro data indicate that CYP3A and SULT enzyme SULT2A1 are mainly involved in the metabolism of palbociclib. Palbociclib is a weak time-dependent inhibitor of CYP3A following daily 125 mg dosing to steady state in humans. In vitro, palbociclib is not an inhibitor of CYP1A2, 2A6, 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C19, and 2D6, and is not an inducer of CYP1A2, 2B6, 2C8, and 3A4 at clinically relevant concentrations.

CYP3A Inhibitors: Data from a drug interaction trial in healthy subjects (N=12) indicate that coadministration of multiple 200 mg daily doses of itraconazole with a single 125 mg IBRANCE dose increased palbociclib AUCINF and the Cmax by approximately 87% and 34%, respectively, relative to a single 125 mg IBRANCE dose given alone [see Drug Interactions (7.1)].

CYP3A Inducers: Data from a drug interaction trial in healthy subjects (N=15) indicate that coadministration of multiple 600 mg daily doses of rifampin, a strong CYP3A inducer, with a single 125 mg IBRANCE dose decreased palbociclib AUCINF and Cmax by 85% and 70%, respectively, relative to a single 125 mg IBRANCE dose given alone. Data from a drug interaction trial in healthy subjects (N=14) indicate that coadministration of multiple 400 mg daily doses of modafinil, a moderate CYP3A inducer, with a single 125 mg IBRANCE dose decreased palbociclib AUCINF and Cmax by 32% and 11%, respectively, relative to a single 125 mg IBRANCE dose given alone [see Drug Interactions (7.2)].

CYP3A Substrates: Palbociclib is a weak time-dependent inhibitor of CYP3A following daily 125 mg dosing to steady state in humans. In a drug interaction trial in healthy subjects (N=26), coadministration of midazolam with multiple doses of IBRANCE increased the midazolam AUCINF and the Cmax values by 61% and 37%, respectively, as compared to administration of midazolam alone [see Drug Interactions (7.3)].

Gastric pH Elevating Medications: In a drug interaction trial in healthy subjects, coadministration of a single 125 mg dose of IBRANCE with multiple doses of the proton pump inhibitor (PPI) rabeprazole under fed conditions decreased palbociclib Cmax by 41%, but had limited impact on AUCINF (13% decrease), when compared to a single dose of IBRANCE administered alone. Given the reduced effect on gastric pH of H2-receptor antagonists and local antacids compared to PPIs, the effect of these classes of acid-reducing agents on palbociclib exposure under fed conditions is expected to be minimal. Under fed conditions there is no clinically relevant effect of PPIs, H2-receptor antagonists, or local antacids on palbociclib exposure. In another healthy subject study, coadministration of a single dose of IBRANCE with multiple doses of the PPI rabeprazole under fasted conditions decreased palbociclib AUCINF and Cmax by 62% and 80%, respectively, when compared to a single dose of IBRANCE administered alone.

Letrozole: Data from a clinical trial in patients with breast cancer showed that there was no drug interaction between palbociclib and letrozole when the 2 drugs were coadministered.

Fulvestrant: Data from a clinical trial in patients with breast cancer showed that there was no clinically relevant drug interaction between palbociclib and fulvestrant when the 2 drugs were coadministered.

Goserelin: Data from a clinical trial in patients with breast cancer showed that there was no clinically relevant drug interaction between palbociclib and goserelin when the 2 drugs were coadministered.

Anastrozole or exemestane: No clinical data are available to evaluate drug interactions between anastrozole or exemestane and palbociclib. A clinically significant drug interaction between anastrozole or exemestane and palbociclib is not expected based on analyses of the effects of anastrozole, exemestane and palbociclib on or by metabolic pathways or transporter systems.

Effect of Palbociclib on Transporters: In vitro evaluations indicated that palbociclib has a low potential to inhibit the activities of drug transporters organic anion transporter (OAT)1, OAT3, organic cation transporter (OCT)2, and organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP)1B1, OATP1B3 at clinically relevant concentrations. In vitro, palbociclib has the potential to inhibit OCT1 at clinically relevant concentrations, as well as the potential to inhibit P-glycoprotein (P-gp) or breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) in the gastrointestinal tract at the proposed dose.

Effect of Transporters on Palbociclib: Based on in vitro data, P-gp and BCRP mediated transport are unlikely to affect the extent of oral absorption of palbociclib at therapeutic doses.

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