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ERAXIS® (anidulafungin)

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Our scientific content is evidence-based, scientifically balanced and non-promotional. It undergoes rigorous internal medical review and is updated regularly to reflect new information.

ERAXIS® Quick Finder

Use in Specific Populations

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8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

8.1 Pregnancy

Risk Summary

Based on findings from animal studies, ERAXIS can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. There are no available human data on the use of ERAXIS in pregnant women to inform a drug-associated risk of adverse developmental outcomes. In animal reproduction studies fetal toxicity was observed in the presence of maternal toxicity when anidulafungin was administered to pregnant rabbits during organogenesis at 4 times the proposed therapeutic maintenance dose of 100 mg/day on the basis of relative body surface area [see Data]. Inform pregnant woman of the risk to the fetus.

The estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated populations are unknown. In the U.S. general population, the estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies is 2–4% and 15–20% respectively.

Data

Animal Data

In a combined fertility and embryo-fetal development study in rats dosed with anidulafungin for 4 weeks prior to cohabitation and through cohabitation for males or for 2 weeks prior to cohabitation and continuing through gestation day 19 for females, there was no maternal or embryo-fetal toxicity at intravenous doses up to 20 mg/kg/day (equivalent to 2 times the proposed therapeutic maintenance dose of 100 mg/day on the basis of relative body surface area).

In a rabbit embryo-fetal development study, intravenous administration of anidulafungin (0, 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg/day) from gestation day 7 through 19, resulted in reduced fetal weights and incomplete ossification in the presence of maternal toxicity (decreased body weight gain) at 20 mg/kg/day (equivalent to 4 times the proposed therapeutic maintenance dose of 100 mg/day on the basis of relative body surface area).

In a pre- and postnatal development study, pregnant rats were intravenously administered anidulafungin at doses of 2, 6, or 20 mg/kg/day from gestation day 7 through lactation day 20. Maternal toxicity was observed at ≥6 mg/kg/day (clinical signs at ≥6 mg/kg/day and reduced body weight gain and food consumption during gestation at 20 mg/kg/day group). There were no effects on the viability or growth and development of the offspring. In this study, anidulafungin was detected in fetal plasma, indicating that it crossed the placental barrier.

8.2 Lactation

Risk Summary

There are no data on the presence of anidulafungin in human milk, the effects on the breastfed infant or the effects on milk production. Anidulafungin was found in the milk of lactating rats [see Data]. The developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding should be considered along with the mother's clinical need for ERAXIS and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed child from ERAXIS or from the underlying maternal condition.

Data

Animal Data

Pregnant rats were intravenously administered anidulafungin at doses of 2, 6, or 20 mg/kg/day from gestation day 7 through lactation day 20. Milk samples were collected from 5 rats per group on lactation day 14 at approximately 1 hours post dose. Approximately dose-proportional anidulafungin concentrations were found in the milk of lactating rats.

8.4 Pediatric Use

The safety and effectiveness of ERAXIS in patients ≤16 years old has not been established [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.4)].

8.5 Geriatric Use

Dosage adjustments are not required for geriatric patients [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

Of the total number of subjects (N = 197) in the pivotal clinical studies of anidulafungin, 35% were 65 years and over, while 18% were 75 years and over. No overall differences in safety or effectiveness were observed between these subjects and younger subjects, and other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients, but greater sensitivity of some older individuals cannot be ruled out.

8.6 Hepatic Insufficiency

No dosing adjustments are required for patients with any degree of hepatic insufficiency. Anidulafungin is not hepatically metabolized. Anidulafungin pharmacokinetics were examined in subjects with Child-Pugh class A, B or C hepatic insufficiency. Anidulafungin concentrations were not increased in subjects with any degree of hepatic insufficiency. Though a slight decrease in AUC was observed in patients with Child-Pugh C hepatic insufficiency, it was within the range of population estimates noted for healthy subjects [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

8.7 Renal Insufficiency

Dosage adjustments are not required for patients with any degree of renal insufficiency including those on hemodialysis. Anidulafungin has negligible (<1%) renal clearance. In a clinical study of subjects with mild, moderate, severe or end stage (dialysis-dependent) renal insufficiency, anidulafungin pharmacokinetics were similar to those observed in subjects with normal renal function. Anidulafungin is not dialyzable and may be administered without regard to the timing of hemodialysis [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

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