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BOSULIF®Use in Specific Populations (bosutinib)

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

8.1 Pregnancy

Risk Summary

Based on findings from animal studies and its mechanism of action, BOSULIF can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.1)].

There are no available data in pregnant women to inform the drug-associated risk. In animal reproduction studies conducted in rats and rabbits, oral administration of bosutinib during organogenesis caused adverse developmental outcomes, including structural abnormalities, embryo-fetal mortality, and alterations to growth at maternal exposures (AUC) as low as 1.2 times the human exposure at the dose of 500 mg/day (see Data). Advise pregnant women of the potential risk to a fetus.

The background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated population is unknown. All pregnancies have a background risk of birth defect, loss, or other adverse outcomes. In the U.S. general population, the estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies are 2–4% and 15–20%, respectively.

Data

Animal Data

In a rat fertility and early embryonic development study, bosutinib was administered orally to female rats for approximately 3 to 6 weeks, depending on day of mating (2 weeks prior to cohabitation with untreated breeder males until gestation day [GD] 7). Increased embryonic resorptions occurred at greater than or equal to 10 mg/kg/day of bosutinib (1.6 and 1.2 times the human exposure at the recommended doses of 400 or 500 mg/day, respectively), and decreased implantations and reduced number of viable embryos at 30 mg/kg/day of bosutinib (3.4 and 2.5 times the human exposure at the recommended doses of 400 or 500 mg/day, respectively).

In an embryo-fetal development study conducted in rabbits, bosutinib was administered orally to pregnant animals during the period of organogenesis at doses of 3, 10, and 30 mg/kg/day. At the maternally-toxic dose of 30 mg/kg/day of bosutinib, there were fetal anomalies (fused sternebrae, and 2 fetuses had various visceral observations), and an approximate 6% decrease in fetal body weight. The dose of 30 mg/kg/day resulted in exposures (AUC) approximately 5.1 and 3.8 times the human exposures at the recommended doses of 400 and 500 mg/day, respectively.

Fetal exposure to bosutinib-derived radioactivity during pregnancy was demonstrated in a placental-transfer study in pregnant rats. In a rat pre- and postnatal development study, bosutinib was administered orally to pregnant animals during the period of organogenesis through lactation day 20 at doses of 10, 30, and 70 mg/kg/day. Reduced number of pups born occurred at greater than or equal to 30 mg/kg/day bosutinib (3.4 and 2.5 times the human exposure at the recommended doses of 400 or 500 mg/day, respectively), and increased incidence of total litter loss and decreased growth of offspring after birth occurred at 70 mg/kg/day bosutinib (6.9 and 5.1 times the human exposure at the recommended doses of 400 or 500 mg/day, respectively).

8.2 Lactation

Risk Summary

No data are available regarding the presence of bosutinib or its metabolites in human milk or its effects on a breastfed child or on milk production. However, bosutinib is present in the milk of lactating rats. Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in a nursing child, breastfeeding is not recommended during treatment with BOSULIF and for at least 2 weeks after the last dose.

Animal Data

After a single radiolabeled bosutinib dose to lactating rats, radioactivity was present in the plasma of suckling offspring for 24 to 48 hours.

8.3 Females and Males of Reproductive Potential

Pregnancy

Based on findings from animal studies, BOSULIF can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman [see Use in Specific Populations (8.1)]. Females of reproductive potential should have a pregnancy test prior to starting treatment with BOSULIF.

Contraception

Females

Based on findings from animal studies, BOSULIF can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman [see Use in Specific Populations (8.1)]. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception (methods that result in less than 1% pregnancy rates) during treatment with BOSULIF and for at least 2 weeks after the last dose.

Infertility

The risk of infertility in females or males of reproductive potential has not been studied in humans. Based on findings from animal studies, BOSULIF may cause reduced fertility in females and males of reproductive potential [see Nonclinical Toxicology (13.1)].

8.4 Pediatric Use

The safety and efficacy of BOSULIF in patients less than 18 years of age have not been established.

8.5 Geriatric Use

In the single-arm study in patients with CML who were resistant or intolerant to prior therapy of BOSULIF in patients with Ph+ CML, 20% were age 65 and over, 4% were 75 and over. No overall differences in safety or effectiveness were observed between these patients and younger patients, and other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients, but greater sensitivity of some older individuals cannot be ruled out.

8.6 Renal Impairment

Reduce the BOSULIF starting dose in patients with moderate (creatinine clearance [CLcr] 30 to 50 mL/min, estimated by Cockcroft-Gault (C-G)) and severe (CLcr less than 30 mL/min, C-G) renal impairment at baseline. For patients who have declining renal function while on BOSULIF who cannot tolerate the starting dose, follow dose adjustment recommendations for toxicity [see Dosage and Administration (2.3, 2.5) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. BOSULIF has not been studied in patients undergoing hemodialysis.

8.7 Hepatic Impairment

Reduce the BOSULIF dosage in patients with hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh A, B, or C) [see Dosage and Administration (2.3, 2.5) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

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