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AMIDATE Warnings and Precautions (etomidate injection, USP)

WARNINGS

INTRAVENOUS AMIDATE SHOULD BE ADMINISTERED ONLY BY PERSONS TRAINED IN THE ADMINISTRATION OF GENERAL ANESTHETICS AND IN THE MANAGEMENT OF COMPLICATIONS ENCOUNTERED DURING THE CONDUCT OF GENERAL ANESTHESIA.

BECAUSE OF THE HAZARDS OF PROLONGED SUPPRESSION OF ENDOGENOUS CORTISOL AND ALDOSTERONE PRODUCTION, THIS FORMULATION IS NOT INTENDED FOR ADMINISTRATION BY PROLONGED INFUSION.

Pediatric Neurotoxicity

Published animal studies demonstrate that the administration of anesthetic and sedation drugs that block NMDA receptors and/or potentiate GABA activity increase neuronal apoptosis in the developing brain and result in long-term cognitive deficits when used for longer than 3 hours. The clinical significance of these findings is not clear. However, based on the available data, the window of vulnerability to these changes is believed to correlate with exposures in the third trimester of gestation through the first several months of life, but may extend out to approximately three years of age in humans (see PRECAUTIONS/Pregnancy, Pediatric Use, ANIMAL PHARMACOLOGY AND/OR TOXICOLOGY).

Some published studies in children suggest that similar deficits may occur after repeated or prolonged exposures to anesthetic agents early in life and may result in adverse cognitive or behavioral effects. These studies have substantial limitations, and it is not clear if the observed effects are due to the anesthetic/sedation drug administration or other factors such as the surgery or underlying illness.

Anesthetic and sedation drugs are a necessary part of the care of children needing surgery, other procedures, or tests that cannot be delayed, and no specific medications have been shown to be safer than any other. Decisions regarding the timing of any elective procedures requiring anesthesia should take into consideration the benefits of the procedure weighed against the potential risks.


PRECAUTIONS

Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility

Carcinogenesis

Long-term animal studies to evaluate the carcinogenic potential of etomidate have not been completed.

Mutagenesis

Studies to evaluate the mutagenic potential of etomidate have not been completed.

Impairment of Fertility

In a fertility and early embryonic development study in which male and female rats were treated intravenously with 0.31, 1.25, and 5 mg/kg/day etomidate (0.17, 0.68, and 2.7 times the human induction dose of 0.3 mg/kg based on body surface area) prior to mating, no adverse effects on fertility were noted.

Pregnancy

Risk Summary

There are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. In animal reproduction studies, fetal deaths and reduced pup survival were noted after intravenous administration of etomidate to pregnant rats at doses 0.17 times the human induction dose of 0.3 mg/kg. Reduced pup survival was noted after intravenous administration of etomidate to pregnant rabbits at 1.6 times the human induction dose. Published studies in pregnant primates demonstrate that the administration of anesthetic and sedation drugs that block NMDA receptors and/or potentiate GABA activity during the period of peak brain development increases neuronal apoptosis in the developing brain of the offspring when used for longer than 3 hours. There are no data on pregnancy exposures in primates corresponding to periods prior to the third trimester in humans (see Data).

The estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated population is unknown. All pregnancies have a background risk of birth defect, loss, or other adverse outcomes. In the U.S. general population, the estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies is 2% to 4% and 15% to 20%, respectively.

Data

Animal Data

No malformations or adverse fetal effects were noted in a study in which pregnant rats were intravenously administered 0.31, 1.25, or 5 mg/kg/day etomidate (0.17, 0.68, or 2.7 times the human induction dose of 0.3 mg/kg based on body surface area) during organogenesis (Gestation Days 6–15).

Reduced pup survival was noted in all doses tested in a study in which pregnant rabbits were intravenously administered 1.5 or 4.5 mg/kg/day etomidate (1.6 or 4.9 times the human induction dose of 0.3 mg/kg based on body surface area) during organogenesis (Gestation Day 6–18). These doses also produced maternal toxicity (increased mortality).

Increased still born fetuses and decreased pup survival was noted at all doses tested in a study where pregnant rats were intravenously administered 0.31, 1.25, or 5 mg/kg/day etomidate (0.17, 0.68, or 2.7 times the human induction dose of 0.3 mg/kg based on body surface area) during gestation and throughout lactation (Gestation Day 16 through Lactation Day 21). These doses also produced maternal toxicity (decreased food consumption and increased mortality). In this study, offspring were not evaluated for sexual maturation, neurobehavioral function including learning and memory, or reproductive function.

In a published study in primates, administration of an anesthetic dose of ketamine for 24 hours on Gestation Day 122 increased neuronal apoptosis in the developing brain of the fetus. In other published studies, administration of either isoflurane or propofol for 5 hours on Gestation Day 120 resulted in increased neuronal and oligodendrocyte apoptosis in the developing brain of the offspring. With respect to brain development, this time period corresponds to the third trimester of gestation in the human. The clinical significance of these findings is not clear; however, studies in juvenile animals suggest neuroapoptosis correlates with long-term cognitive deficits (see WARNINGS/Pediatric Neurotoxicity, PRECAUTIONS/Pregnancy, ANIMAL TOXICOLOGY AND/OR PHARMACOLOGY).

Labor and Delivery

There are insufficient data to support use of intravenous AMIDATE in obstetrics, including Caesarean section deliveries. Therefore, such use is not recommended.

Nursing Mothers

It is not known whether this drug is excreted in human milk. Because many drugs are excreted in human milk, caution should be exercised when AMIDATE is administered to a nursing mother.

Pediatric Use

There are inadequate data for AMIDATE to make dosage recommendations for induction of anesthesia in patients below the age of ten (10) years; therefore, such use is not recommended (see also DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION).

Published juvenile animal studies demonstrate that the administration of anesthetic and sedation drugs, such as AMIDATE, that either block NMDA receptors or potentiate the activity of GABA during the period of rapid brain growth or synaptogenesis, results in widespread neuronal and oligodendrocyte cell loss in the developing brain and alterations in synaptic morphology and neurogenesis. Based on comparisons across species, the window of vulnerability to these changes is believed to correlate with exposures in the third trimester of gestation through the first several months of life, but may extend out to approximately 3 years of age in humans.

In primates, exposure to 3 hours of ketamine that produced a light surgical plane of anesthesia did not increase neuronal cell loss, however, treatment regimens of 5 hours or longer of isoflurane increased neuronal cell loss. Data from isoflurane-treated rodents and ketamine-treated primates suggest that the neuronal and oligodendrocyte cell losses are associated with prolonged cognitive deficits in learning and memory. The clinical significance of these nonclinical findings is not known, and healthcare providers should balance the benefits of appropriate anesthesia in pregnant women, neonates, and young children who require procedures with the potential risks suggested by the nonclinical data (see WARNINGS/Pediatric Neurotoxicity, PRECAUTIONS/Pregnancy, and ANIMAL PHARMACOLOGY AND/OR TOXICOLOGY).

Geriatric Use

Clinical data indicates that AMIDATE may induce cardiac depression in elderly patients, particularly those with hypertension (see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY and OTHER ADVERSE OBSERVATIONS, Circulatory System).

Elderly patients may require lower doses of AMIDATE than younger patients. Age-related differences in pharmacokinetic parameters have been observed in clinical studies (see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY and DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION).

This drug is known to be substantially excreted by the kidney, and the risk of toxic reactions to this drug may be greater in patients with impaired renal function. Because elderly patients are more likely to have decreased renal function, care should be taken in dose selection and it may be useful to monitor renal function.

Plasma Cortisol Levels

Induction doses of etomidate have been associated with reduction in plasma cortisol and aldosterone concentrations (see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY). These have not been associated with changes in vital signs or evidence of increased mortality; however, where concern exists for patients undergoing severe stress, exogenous replacement should be considered.

Information for Patients

Effect of anesthetic and sedation drugs on early brain development

Studies conducted in young animals and children suggest repeated or prolonged use of general anesthetic or sedation drugs in children younger than 3 years may have negative effects on their developing brains. Discuss with parents and caregivers the benefits, risks, and timing and duration of surgery or procedures requiring anesthetic and sedation drugs (see WARNINGS/Pediatric Neurotoxicity).

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